Influenzavirus A

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Influenzavirus

 [in″floo-en´zah-vi″rus]
former genus name for the viruses that cause influenza, now found to be two different genera, which were named influenzavirus A and influenzavirus B.
Influenzavirus A a genus of viruses containing the agent of influenza A. See also influenza virus.
Influenzavirus B a genus of viruses containing the agent of influenza B. See also influenza virus.
Influenzavirus C a genus of viruses containing the agent of influenza C. See also influenza virus.

Influenzavirus A

/In·flu·en·za·vi·rus A/ (in″floo-en´zah-vi″rus) a genus of viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae containing the agent of influenza A. See influenza virus, under virus> .

Influenzavirus A

a genus of viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae containing the agent of influenza A. It is usually the cause of epidemics and pandemics. It is divided into subgroups based on two surface proteins: neuraminidase and haemoglutinin. Vaccination against influenza A is available. See also influenza.
References in periodicals archive ?
003 by t test) and significantly higher in the animals inoculated with the pandemic (H1N1) 2009-seasonal influenza virus A (H3N2) NA (p = 0.
Virus titers detected in the lungs and trachea of animals inoculated with pandemic (H1N1)-seasonal influenza virus A (H3N2) NA at 3 dpi were 1.
However, upon repeating the procedure 4 times for both reassortment combinations, the seasonal influenza virus genes that were selected in the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus backbone were more or less consistent, with NA of seasonal influenza virus A (H3N2) being selected in 4/4 attempts, PB1 of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) and PB2 of seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1) in 3/4 attempts, and PA of seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1) in 2/4 attempts.
Moreover, virus shedding of pandemic (H1N1) 2009-seasonal influenza virus A (H3N2) NA from the nose, lungs, and trachea of inoculated ferrets was slightly higher than wild-type pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus.
Inoculation of the reassortant pandemic (H1N1)-seasonal influenza A (H3N2) NA (either with or without the PB1 of seasonal influenza virus A [H3N2]) resulted in higher expression of virus antigen and more severe lesions at all levels of the lower respiratory tract compared with inoculation of wild-type pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus (Table 2; Figure 4).
We conclude that the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus has the potential to reassort with seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1) and influenza virus A (H3N2) and that such reassortment events could result in viruses with increased pathogenicity in ferrets.