morpheme

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Related to Inflectional morpheme: free morpheme, Derivational morpheme

mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, under the assumption that morphology is what makes languages different (Chomsky 1995; Borer 1984), one expects the process of (ab)normal language acquisition of tense to be affected by the syntactic properties of the inflectional morphemes of the language the child is acquiring, as argued for in section 2.
Only after this decision has been made, requirements on syntax, namely the choice of appropriate inflectional morphemes, will be satisfied, and that obligatorily.
Here, as is believed, inflectional morphemes are those that are required obligatorily by the sentence syntax: for good measure, they enter operations which leave syntactic categories of base morphemes untouched.
Align plural is motivated by the fact that the plural morpheme is attached after all other derivational and inflectional morphemes.
Table 2 only lists those inflectional morphemes that are crucially verbal (i.
Having excluded tightly coordinated nouns from consideration, we can conclude that the Turkish morphological system exhibits a split behavior between derivational morphemes and inflectional ones: unlike inflectional morphemes, derivational morphemes cannot have scope over conjuncts and hence they cannot be suspended.
This is probably due to the fact that inflectional and derivational morphemes appear in the postfield of the word, whereas inflectional morphemes, with the exception of the verbal prefix ge- attached to the past participle of weak verbs, do not take up the word prefield.