indigotin

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in·di·go

(in'di-gō), [C.I. 73000]
A blue dyestuff obtained from Indigofera tinctoria, and other species of Indigofera (family Leguminosae); also made synthetically.
Synonym(s): indigo blue, indigotin
[L. indicum, fr. G. indikon, indigo, ntr. of Indikos, Indian]

indigotin

/in·dig·o·tin/ (in″dĭ-go´tin) a neutral, tasteless, insoluble, dark blue powder, the principal ingredient of commercial indigo.
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Instead of a plant, "we engineered a common lab strain of Escherichia coli, a bacteria found in our gut, to be a chemical factory for the production of indigo dye," study co-author John Dueber of the University of California's bioengineering department told AFP.
What surprises me is that the indigo dye process was discovered at all and developed independently so early in multiple parts of the world," Splitstoser says.
grandis and indigo dye were prepared at wavelength of maximum absorption ([[lambda].
The results in the Table 2 pointed out that the activated carbon used in the adsorption tests presented great efficiency in the removal of the Blue Indigo dye for the four masses analyzed of adsorbent.
Art professor Barbara Setsu Picket demonstrates Japanese indigo dye techniques.
Manufacturers dip the yarn, which comes from cotton plants, into a vat of indigo dye.
The researchers had tried numerous projects, ranging from the accidental creation of indigo dye, studying frog skin and work on developing a growth hormone for pigs.
The white cotton turns sea-foam green after it is dipped into a vat of indigo dye, then gradually to a dark blue, or indigo, as it dries.
No-one will ever know who first discovered how to manufacture indigo dye from plants, but the ingenious ancient Egyptians were 'sexing-up' plain linen mummy cloths in the third millennium BC by adding indigo-blue border stripes.
22, 1991, was beaten so viciously that "his body was completely blue, as if he had been dipped in indigo dye.
Blue indigo dye is reduced to its pale yellow leuco form by sodium dithionite (sodium hydrosulfite, [Na.
com] recovers the indigo dye from old denim while making reusable white cotton fiber from retired jeans.