Index Medicus


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index

 (pl. indexes, in´dices) (L.)
1. the numerical ratio of measurement of any part in comparison with a fixed standard.
Barthel index an objective, standardized tool for measuring functional status. The individual is scored in a number of areas depending upon independence of performance. Total scores range from 0 (complete dependence) to 100 (complete independence).
bleeding index any of various methods of assessing bleeding in the gingival sulcus before or after treatment.
body mass index (BMI) the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters, a measure of body fat that gives an indication of nutritional status.
cardiac index cardiac output corrected for body size.
cephalic index 100 times the maximum breadth of the skull divided by its maximum length.
citation index an index listing all publications appearing in a set of source publications (e.g., articles in a defined group of journals) that cite a given publication in their bibliographies.
Colour index a publication of the Society of Dyers and Colourists and the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists containing an extensive list of dyes and dye intermediates. Each chemically distinct compound is identified by a specific number, the C.I. number, avoiding the confusion of trivial names used for dyes in the dye industry.
erythrocyte indices the mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These are all useful for evaluating anemias because they provide information on the size of the erythrocytes and the concentration of hemoglobin. Called also red cell or red blood cell indices.
glycemic index a ranking of foods based on the response of postprandial blood sugar levels as compared with a reference food, usually either white bread or glucose. See table.
left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) an index of the amount of work performed by the heart.
leukopenic index a fall of 1000 or more in the total leukocyte count within 1.5 hours after ingestion of a given food; it indicates allergic hypersensitivity to that food.
index Medicus a monthly publication of the national library of medicine in which the world's leading biomedical literature is indexed by author and subject.
opsonic index a measure of opsonic activity determined by the ratio of the number of microorganisms phagocytized by normal leukocytes in the presence of serum from an individual infected by the microorganism, to the number phagocytized in serum from a normal individual.
phagocytic index any arbitrary measure of the ability of neutrophils to ingest native or opsonized particles determined by various assays; it reflects either the average number of particles ingested or the rate at which particles are cleared from the blood or culture medium.
red blood cell indices (red cell indices) erythrocyte indices.
refractive index the refractive power of a medium compared with that of air (assumed to be 1).
short increment sensitivity index (SISI) a hearing test in which randomly spaced, 0.5-second tone bursts are superimposed at 1- to 5-decibel increments in intensity on a carrier tone having the same frequency and an intensity of 20 decibels above the speech recognition threshold.
therapeutic index originally, the ratio of the maximum tolerated dose to the minimum curative dose; now defined as the ratio of the median lethal dose (LD50) to the median effective dose (ED50). It is used in assessing the safety of a drug.

Index Medicus

an index published monthly by the National Library of Medicine, which lists articles from the medical, nursing, and allied health literature from throughout the world by subject and by author. The Cumulative Index Medicus is published yearly. It contains the citations in all 12 issues of the Index Medicus, which can be accessed electronically.

Index Medicus

A publication of the National Library of Medicine that lists biomedical and health sciences journal articles by title, subject, field, and country of publication. The major national and international medical and biological journals are indexed.
See also: index

index

pl. indexes, indices [L.] the numerical ratio of measurement of any part in comparison with a fixed standard.

index case
the first case of a disease in a group to be brought to the attention of the clinician.
Color index
a publication of the Society of Dyers and Colorists and the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, containing an extensive list of dyes and dye intermediates. Each chemically distinct compound is identified by a specific number, the CI number, avoiding the confusion of trivial names used for dyes in the dye industry. The Royal Horticultural Society, London, produces a similar document to aid in the identification of flower colors.
erythrocyte i's
see erythrocyte indices.
index Medicus
a monthly publication of the National Library of Medicine, in which the world's leading biomedical literature is indexed by author and subject.
opsonic index
a measure of opsonic activity determined by the ratio of the number of microorganisms phagocytized by normal leukocytes in the presence of serum from an animal infected by the microorganism, to the number phagocytized in serum from a normal animal.
phagocytic index
the average number of bacteria ingested per leukocyte of the patient's blood.
production index
a method of expressing production compared with a potential or target.
refractive index
the refractive power of a medium compared with that of air (assumed to be 1).
therapeutic index
originally, the ratio of the maximum tolerated dose to the minimum curative dose; now defined as the ratio of the median lethal dose (LD50) to the median effective dose (ED50). It is used in assessing the safety of a drug.
index Veterinarius
a periodic listing of all publications in the veterinary literature by the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, United Kingdom. Also available on on-line data search.
vital index
the ratio of births to deaths within a given time in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Computerization of the Index Medicus in the 1960s, and later advent of the Internet, revolutionized the process of information transfer.
The bibliographies were searched in detail, and librarians had to become skilled in searching Index Medicus, the Index Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office, Biological Abstracts, Psychological Abstracts, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and a variety of foreign language indexes.
The only significant difference in use rates was that the internal medicine faculty used research articles and index Medicus more frequently and clinical manuals less frequently.
Yet another option is the African Index Medicus, but this is a much smaller database that only aims to mine the regional literature that is not covered by PubMed.
Medscape has announced that its electronic medical journal, Medscape Women's Health, has been selected for inclusion in the National Library of Medicine's Index Medicus and its online counterpart MEDLINE.
The study found little use of Index Medicus or computerized bibliographic retrieval systems such as MEDLINE.
The Humans, English, and Abridged Index Medicus (AIM) filters are distinct.
The total cost of a one-year subscription to all titles listed in Index Medicus has climbed 51.
In fact, he made this statement several times, to different audiences, and in such varied contexts that it is not easy to be certain just what Welch was praising: Billings's commitment to indexing or the two products of this commitment, Index Medicus and the Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office, United States Army.
The yearly subscription worth of the print publications is about $250,000 (my estimate is based on pricing data from the excellent Index Medicus Price Index data compiled by EBSCO).
Brodman was at her best in describing Billings' work and his monumental Index-Catalogue, Index Medicus, and system for interlibrary loan [6].
I then output the data using the Index Medicus punctuation file.