polyuria

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polyuria

 [pol″e-u´re-ah]
excessive excretion of urine, such as with diabetes mellitus.

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yū'rē-ă),
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

/poly·uria/ (-ūr´e-ah) excessive secretion of urine.

polyuria

(pōl′ē-yo͝or′ē-ə)
n.
Excessive passage of urine, as in diabetes.

pol′y·u′ric adj.

polyuria

[pol′ēyoo͡r′ē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, polys + ouron, urine
the excretion of an abnormally large quantity of urine. Some causes of polyuria are diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, use of diuretics, excessive fluid intake, and hypercalcemia.

polyuria

Nephrology Excessive urination due to ↑ production

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse micturition; causes include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, and hypercalcemia, but sometimes results from overhydration.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

The formation of abnormally large quantities of urine. See also POLYDIPSIA.

Polyuria

Excessive production of urine.

pol·y·u·ri·a

(pol'ē-yūr'ē-ă)
Excessive excretion of urine resulting in profuse and frequent micturition.
[poly- + G. ouron, urine]

polyuria

the formation and excretion of a large volume of urine. A history of polyuria in an animal is as unreliable as a history of polydipsia. A quantitative assurance that polydipsia is present suggests an error of renal tubular efficiency either as a result of toxic damage or an absence of the pituitary gland's antidiuretic hormone.

compensatory polyuria
see physiological polyuria (below).
pathological polyuria
that caused by a disease of the kidney or disorder elsewhere in the body, e.g. diabetes mellitus or liver failure.
pharmacological polyuria
is caused by administered fluids or medication, such as glucocorticoids or diuretics.
physiological polyuria
the result of increased fluid intake; called also compensatory polyuria (above).
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Subject was a 9 year old boy with an increased urinary frequency of about 14 times per day.
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