inclusion

(redirected from Inclusions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

inclusion

 [in-kloo´zhun]
1. the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion.
cell inclusion a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell.
fetal inclusion a partially developed embryo enclosed within the body of its twin.

in·clu·sion

(in-klū'zhŭn),
1. Any foreign or heterogeneous substance contained in a cell or in any tissue or organ, not introduced as a result of trauma.
2. The process by which a foreign or heterogeneous structure is misplaced in another tissue.
[L. inclusio, a shutting in, fr. includo, pp. -clusus, to close in]

inclusion

/in·clu·sion/ (in-kloo´zhun)
1. the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion.

cell inclusion  a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell.
dental inclusion 
1. a tooth so surrounded with bony tissue that it is unable to erupt.
2. a cyst of oral soft tissue or bone.

inclusion

[inklo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, in, within, claudere, to shut
1 the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2 a structure within another, such as an inclusion in the cytoplasm of the cells.
3 models based on the premise that children with special needs should be educated in a regular classroom (instead of a self-contained classroom) with support personnel or services provided in that classroom.
Pediatrics The education of a student with disabilities in a regular classroom in a neighbourhood school with sufficient support so the student can participate fully
Social medicine The placing of learning- or otherwise impaired children in the same environment as other children, while supplementing learning with various educational maneuvers

in·clu·sion

(in-klū'zhŭn)
1. Any foreign or heterogeneous substance contained in a cell or in any tissue or organ, not introduced as a result of trauma.
2. The process by which a foreign or heterogeneous structure is misplaced in another tissue.
[L. inclusio, a shutting in, fr. includo, pp. -clusus, to close in]

inclusion

a particle or structure contained within a cell or organ.

inclusion

1. the act of enclosing or the condition of being enclosed.
2. anything that is enclosed; a cell inclusion.

epithelial inclusion
probably endothelial displacements during embryonic development; epithelial cells in acinar or ductal structure enclosed in a layer of epithelial cells on a basement membrane.
cell inclusion
a usually lifeless, often temporary, constituent in the cytoplasm of a cell.
chlamydial inclusion
see elementary body.
dental inclusion
a tooth so surrounded with bony material that it is unable to erupt.
fetal inclusion
a partially developed embryo enclosed within the body of its twin.
nutritive i's
glycogen inclusions, visible only with electron microscope, include α-particles (rosettes) and β-particles (single particles).
References in periodicals archive ?
956 inclusion could allocate more income to the passive basket of the U.
The presence or absence of both acidophilic intranuclear inclusions and white intranuclear inclusions within the proliferative lesions was observed and documented.
More recent studies have dealt with the calcium aluminates type of inclusions present in steel and their deformation behaviour during the hot working process (Faulring, and Farrell et al.
Inside the lymph nodes, the epithelial inclusions are arranged in cysts or as numerous structures resembling ducts (Hong et al.
Not much else was done until Ed Roedder applied inclusions to a wide range of geological problems," Bodnar said.
Inclusion forces regular-classroom teachers to face challenges for which they were never properly trained.
When stainless steel doesn't have any sulfide inclusions, pitting doesn't occur.
For the rocks to contain the information necessary for us to learn about conditions of mineral formation, fluid inclusions must have formed during mineral growth and must be preserved in the crystals.
Under this same rule, A and B account for their pro-rata shares of Fsub's ordinary earnings and net capital gain according to the general rules for inclusions of partnership income (i.

Full browser ?