inclusion bodies


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in·clu·sion bod·ies

distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses; may be demonstrated by means of various stains, especially Mann eosin methylene blue or Giemsa techniques and visible by light microscopy. Nuclear inclusion bodies are usually acidophilic and are of two morphologic types: 1) granular, hyaline, or amorphous bodies of various sizes, that is, Cowdry type A inclusion bodies, occurring in such diseases as herpes simplex infection or yellow fever; 2) more circumscribed bodies, frequently with several in the same nucleus (and no reaction in adjacent tissue), that is, the type B bodies, occurring in such diseases as Rift Valley fever and poliomyelitis. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies may be: 1) acidophilic, relatively large, spheric or ovoid, and somewhat granular, as in variola or vaccinia, rabies, and molluscum contagiosum; 2) basophilic, relatively large, complex combinations of viral and cellular material, as in trachoma, psittacosis, and lymphogranuloma venereum. In some instances, inclusion bodies are known to be infective and probably represent aggregates of virus particles in combination with cellular material, whereas others are apparently not infective and may represent only abnormal products formed by the cell in response to injury.

inclusion bodies

normal or abnormal objects of various shapes and sizes observed in the nucleus or cytoplasm of blood cells or other tissue cells.

in·clu·sion bod·ies

(in-klū'zhŭn bod'ēz)
Distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with various filterable viruses; observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells.

inclusion bodies

Microscopically visible masses of virus material, or areas of altered staining behaviour, seen within cells in a number of virus infections such as RABIES, herpes infections, papovavirus infections and adenovirus infections.
References in periodicals archive ?
Expression, purification and renaturation of truncated human integrin b1 from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.
Infantile digital fibroma mainly differs from these other lesions by being centered in the dermis and exhibiting characteristic perinuclear cytoplasmic inclusion bodies.
Even though these inclusion bodies traditionally have been an obstacle in the industrial production of soluble enzymes and biodrugs, they were recently recognized as having large amounts of functional proteins with direct values in industrial and biomedical applications.
Phyllodes tumor of the breast containing the intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies identical with infantile digital fibromatosis.
In both cases, intranuclear inclusion bodies were found on histopathology, but were difficult to detect.
In 1961, Van Reeth and colleagues described the presence of intracellular inclusion bodies in the anterior horn cells of a patient with Pick's dementia and atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) [1].
Giant cells (4/63) and histiocytic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (11/63) were located predominantly in the Peyer's patches in the small intestine.
A biopsy specimen showed epithelial necrosis with cellular ballooning and multinucleated giant cells, plus intranuclear inclusion bodies (Figure 2, panels A and B).
In this rare, autosomal recessive disorder, giant inclusion bodies are found in granule-containing cells.
From the standpoint of pathology, both entities are characterized by tubulointerstitial disease and fibrosis, but only early lead nephropathy is characterized by the presence of proximal tubule nuclear inclusion bodies, due to the combination of lead with a lead binding-protein.
For example, other tests which are of value may be iron studies, electrophoresis, and the presence of inclusion bodies.
Expression of the fusion peptide in a host cell results in a product that is insoluble and contained within inclusion bodies in the cell and/or cell lysate.