combustion

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combustion

 [kom-bus´chun]
rapid oxidation with emission of heat.

com·bus·tion

(kom-bŭs'chŭn),
Burning, the rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]

combustion

/com·bus·tion/ (kom-bus´chun) rapid oxidation with emission of heat.

combustion

[kəmbus′chen]
the process of burning or oxidation, which may be accompanied by light and heat. Oxygen itself does not burn, but it supports combustion. The rate of combustion is influenced by both oxygen concentration and its partial pressure.

com·bus·tion

(kŏm-bŭs'chŭn)
Burning; rapid oxidation of any substance accompanied by the production of heat and light.
[L. comburo, pp. -bustus, to burn up]

combustion

rapid oxidation with emission of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Higher values of the ignition temperature of volatile products and self-ignition and time for ignition or self-ignition confirm the above conclusion, since polyester materials containing flame retardants Mo[O.
The ignition temperature of polymeric roof damp proof foil was 380 [degrees]C and the corresponding induction period was 7 min.
The decrease in the ignition temperature of this order for the recuperative converter is attributed to this temperature rise (Figure 12).
Included are data on aspects such as toxicity, vapor density, water solubility, ignition temperature, boiling point, and reactivity.
It doesn't take too long to get to ignition temperature and burst into flames.
More importantly, the ignition temperature for dust clouds of dried pulp is 500[degrees]C.
Electrosurgery can lead to a localized fire when a small amount of flammable material is heated to its ignition temperature.
Plus, it has a high ignition temperature and narrow range of flammability, which makes accidental combustion unlikely.
6 MJ / kg (PN-C 96024: 2011);The minimum ignition temperature of 56 A C;max.
and covers fireplace types, chimney fires and creosote, dryer vent fires, masonry versus prefabricated fireplaces, safe operating guidelines, NFPA codes versus local codes, installation errors that lead to fires, ignition temperature, carbon monoxide issues, blast furnace effect, combustible materials, wildlife in chimneys and vents, proper maintenance, types of firewood, common solid fuel and gas combustion appliance myths and misconceptions, recommended and dangerous hearth products, fire suppression for chimney and fireplace emergencies, positive pressure ventilation and differences between North American and European chimney systems.
The combustion reaction parameters, such as ignition temperature, burning temperature, maximum burning rate and peak temperature, are obtained in various stages.