iatrogenesis


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Related to iatrogenesis: iatrogenic, iatrogenic illness

iatrogenesis

(ī″a-trō-jen′ĕ-sĭs) [ iatro- + genesis]
Any injury or illness that occurs because of medical care. Some examples: chemotherapy used to treat cancer may cause nausea, vomiting, hair loss, or depressed white blood cell counts. The use of a Foley catheter for incontinence can create a urinary tract infection and urinary sepsis. In the U.S., , 0.67% of patients admitted to a hospital die because of health care associated error.iatrogenic (-jen′ĭk), adjective

cascade iatrogenesis

A treatment that worsens a patient's clinical condition, resulting in further treatment that produces more undesirable effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most obvious criminal justice counterpart to iatrogenesis is labelling (Becker, 1963).
While it is clear cascade iatrogenesis can be categorized as an adverse event, Tsilimingras and colleagues (2003) suggest geriatric syndromes also should be considered adverse events given their impact on mortality in older adults, the evidence that the syndromes can be prevented, and the understanding that prevention of such syndromes often requires a systems approach to the delivery of care.
While the term was generally applied to inadvertent harm induced by treatment in the hospital, Ivan Illich also described "social iatrogenesis" and "cultural iatrogenesis.
Iatrogenesis is one powerful example of an important truth: Science and technology can, and perhaps increasingly do, have negative consequences.
Because indwelling catheters are associated with iatrogenesis and morbid outcomes in this population and these are important QIs over which facilities have some control, the steering committee recommended both QIs.
Sheiham states that operative procedures or dental materials are the more widely recognized causes of clinical iatrogenesis in dentistry.
First, the enterprise of medicating schizophrenia was characterized for nearly three decades by the mass production of obvious treatment-induced disease, accompanied nonetheless by mass professional denial that such iatrogenesis was occurring (see, among others, Brown & Funk, 1986; Cohen, 1997b; Gelman, 1999; Whitaker, 2001).
6) Illich's central concept was that of iatrogenesis -- disease caused by medical intervention.
First, a handbook on dissociation should have included chapters about the critical tradition that argues for iatrogenesis and false memories in the creation and development of DID and other dissociative disorders, since they are widely discussed and taken seriously by many in the psychological and psychiatric communities.
The phenomenon of iatrogenesis, and the convincing evidence that false memories exist, raise questions as to the accuracy of reports of recovered repressed memories of more mundane varieties of abuse.
It is an unrelenting critique of doctor-caused disease, or what Illich calls iatrogenesis.