iatrogenesis


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Related to iatrogenesis: iatrogenic, iatrogenic illness

iatrogenesis

(ī″a-trō-jen′ĕ-sĭs) [ iatro- + genesis]
Any injury or illness that occurs because of medical care. Some examples: chemotherapy used to treat cancer may cause nausea, vomiting, hair loss, or depressed white blood cell counts. The use of a Foley catheter for incontinence can create a urinary tract infection and urinary sepsis. In the U.S., , 0.67% of patients admitted to a hospital die because of health care associated error.iatrogenic (-jen′ĭk), adjective

cascade iatrogenesis

A treatment that worsens a patient's clinical condition, resulting in further treatment that produces more undesirable effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most obvious criminal justice counterpart to iatrogenesis is labelling (Becker, 1963).
Philosopher Ivan Illich, in his book Medical Nemesis, describes a kind of social iatrogenesis, whereby dependence upon the health care system reduces an individual's ability to heal himself.
First, a handbook on dissociation should have included chapters about the critical tradition that argues for iatrogenesis and false memories in the creation and development of DID and other dissociative disorders, since they are widely discussed and taken seriously by many in the psychological and psychiatric communities.
The phenomenon of iatrogenesis, and the convincing evidence that false memories exist, raise questions as to the accuracy of reports of recovered repressed memories of more mundane varieties of abuse.
It is an unrelenting critique of doctor-caused disease, or what Illich calls iatrogenesis.
Under the first, the manifest critiques, they address the problems of clinical iatrogenesis (diseases caused by medical intervention), the growth of mutant organisms (like drug-resistant strains of bacteria), the growing cost of treatment, environmentally induced health problems due to the spread of urban-industrial lifestyles, and what has been called the pharmaceuticalization of health.
One whose mid-stay severity was worse than his admission or discharge severity score might be the victim of iatrogenesis (line C).
Topics include the three Ds (dementia, delirium, and depression), end-of-life care, frailty, and iatrogenesis.
In the mid-1970s the controversial social critic Ivan Illich warned of the dangers of "social iatrogenesis," an inability to cope with our surroundings engendered in part by the medicalization of everyday life.