will

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will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.

will

(wil),
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

Etymology: AS, wyllan
1 the mental faculty that enables one to consciously choose or decide on a course of action.
2 the act or process of exercising the power of choice.
3 a wish, desire, or deliberate intention.
4 a disposition or attitude toward another or others.
5 determination or purpose; willfulness.
6 (in law) an expression or declaration of a person's wishes as to the disposition of property to be performed or take effect after death. Also called volition.

will

Forensics
“The legal expression or declaration of a person’s mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death”.

Medspeak-UK
A document which sets out who is to benefit from an individual’s property and possessions (estate) after his or her death. It also ensures that the estate is passed as intended, after taxes and debts have been paid.

Vox populi
Desire or volition (as in the “will to live”).

will

1. Desire, volition, as in the 'will to live', see there.
2. 'The legal expression or declaration of a person's mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death'. See Advance directive, Living will.

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will,

n a legal document detailing one's wishes in the disposal of one's body and property and the care of one's minor children and dependents.
will, living,
n a document that details one's wishes regarding the degree and amount of health care desired if one becomes mentally incapacitated.
References in classic literature ?
Why should you wish to force me to do what I'll willingly do of myself?
It's for me to make that trip," said Sanchica; "take me with you, senor, behind you on your horse; for I'll go with all my heart to see my father.
That means more houses and more land, and that means me, for I'll be there to sell them the land.
I don't care for that; if he'll just drop those row-dies and come back, I'll hold my tongue and not preach.
Well, I'll do my best," promised Anne, burying her face in Marilla's lap.
I'll leave my hair in the papers till tomorrow evening, and then I'll have beautiful curls.
Today I'll follow the pipes, and tomorrow I'll go to school.
Come, madam, you must go along with me by fair means, or I'll have you carried down to the coach.
I've a great notion of the family, and I mean to do the right by you; but while I'm taking a bit think to mysel' of what's the best thing to put you to -- whether the law, or the meenistry, or maybe the army, whilk is what boys are fondest of -- I wouldnae like the Balfours to be humbled before a wheen Hieland Campbells, and I'll ask you to keep your tongue within your teeth.
Threatening him with, "If you open your mouth to kick I'll shove it in," she coated his face with lather.
I'll give you a clue to my trade, in a game of forfeits.
too; and when her mother sate crying at night and saying, "My poor lad--it's nothing but right he should come home," Maggie said, "Let me go for him, and tell him, mother; I'll go to-morrow morning if father doesn't know me and want me.

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