hysteresis

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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

/hys·te·re·sis/ (his″tĕ-re´sis) [Gr.]
1. a time lag in the occurrence of two associated phenomena, as between cause and effect.
2. in cardiac pacemaker terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing.

hysteresis

[his′tərē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, hysterein, to be late
1 a lagging or retardation of one of two associated phenomena or a failure to act in unison.
2 the influence of the previous condition or treatment of the body on its subsequent response to a given force, as in the elastic property of a lung. At any given lung volume the elastic recoil pressure within the airways during expiration is less than that which exists at the same lung volume during inspiration.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis (histerē´sis),

n a physical phenomenon whereby a material such as a reversible hydrocolloid passes from a solid to a gel state at one temperature and a gel to a solid state at another.

hysteresis

the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Up to two Comparators with selectable Hysterisis, internal voltage-reference options, and S/R latch mode for switch mode power conversion
The second feature of the mechanical annealing process, shown in figure 6b, is that the hysterisis set, which is the extent of the transient deformation in the sample during an extension and contraction cycle, rapidly diminishes between the first and second cycles to the same elongation.
The DSP98 transmitter, working in tandem with a matching receiver, is sensitive to hysterisis signal level changes.
Other vulcanizate properties such as hysterisis, heat build up and permanent set are properties that relate to tan [delta].
The flatness is [+ or - 1] dB; and hysterisis is 1 dB.
4 volts, with less hysterisis since the controller receives its input voltage from a usually more constant source.
Due to the dynamic service life of a tire, the ideal vulcanization system provides thermal stability, low hysterisis and high flex fatigue resistance without negatively affecting the processing requirements of the tire compound.