hypospadias

(redirected from Hypospadius)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Hypospadius: Hypospadias and Epispadias

hypospadias

 [hi″po-spa´de-as]
a developmental anomaly in which the urethra opens inferior to its normal position, usually in males with the opening on the underside of the penis or on the perineum. In perineal hypospadias the opening on the perineum is accompanied by severe deformity of the penis and testes so that the individual has male pseudohermaphroditism.
Hypospadias with chordee. From Dorland's, 2000.
female hypospadias a developmental anomaly in the female in which the urethra opens into the vagina.

hy·po·spa·di·as

(hī'pō-spā'dē-ăs), [MIM*146450]
A developmental anomaly characterized by a defect on the ventral surface of the penis so that the urethral meatus is proximal to its normal location; may be associated with chordee; also a similar defect in the female, in which the urethra opens into the vagina. Compare: epispadias.
[hypo- + G. spaō, to tear or gouge]

hypospadias

/hy·po·spa·di·as/ (-spa´de-is) a developmental anomaly in which the urethra opens inferior to its normal location; usually seen in males, with the opening on the underside of the penis or on the perineum.hypospadi´ac
female hypospadias  a developmental anomaly in the female in which the urethra opens into the vagina.

hypospadias

[hī′pōspā′dē·əs]
Etymology: Gk, hypo, under + spadōn, a rent
a developmental anomaly in the male in which the urethra opens on the ventral aspect of the penis or on the perineum.
enlarge picture
Hypospadias

hypospadias

Pediatric urology A congenital defect in the positioning of the urethral meatus on the penis or vagina Types Mild male hypospadias–opening is slightly displaced below the tip of the penis; severe male hypospadias, opening is in the female position at the base of the scrotum; the penis has an open gutter under the penis; the penis may be small. See Epispadia, Micropenis/microphallus.

hy·po·spa·di·as

(hī'pō-spā'dē-ăs)
A developmental anomaly characterized by a defect on the ventral surface of the penis so that the urethral meatus (urethral opening) is more proximal than normal; may be associated with chordee; also, a similar defect in the female in which the urethra opens into the vagina.
Compare: epispadias
Synonym(s): urogenital sinus anomaly.
[hypo- + G. spaō, to tear or gouge]

hypospadias

A congenital abnormality of the penis in which the urine tube (URETHRA) opens on the underside of the organ, either at the neck of the bulb (glans) or further back. The prevalence of the condition has doubled in the last 30 years. Hypospadias causes inconvenience in urination and possible infertility, but surgical correction is possible. Tissue culture can be used to provide sheets of artificially grown natural material to line the extended portion of the urethra.

Hypospadias

A congenital deformity of the penis where the urinary tract opening is not at the tip of the glans.
Mentioned in: Circumcision

hypospadias

a developmental anomaly in the male in which the urethra opens on the underside of the penis or on the perineum.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are some known risk factors: hypospadius in the family, exposure to estrogens or fertility drugs during pregnancy, and certain rare syndromes of abnormal development.
There were reports in recent decades that the incidence of hypospadius seemed to be increasing, which led to speculation that mothers might be receiving toxic exposure to hormones or hormone-like substances in the environment.
If hypospadius is found, it is vital that a newborn circumcision not be attempted.
Decades ago, hypospadius repairs were often delayed until several years of age, but modern practice is to do the repair when the child is old enough to have had good penile growth (usually about 6 months of age), but not so old that care afterwards becomes more difficult or so old that the child will remember the surgery (usually not later than one-to-two years of age).
The vast majority of hypospadius repairs today take place between the ages of six-to-twelve months.
With hypospadius that doesn't involve an abnormal location of the urethral opening, the repair is much simpler, and an experienced general urologist who is comfortable with operating on infants can often straighten the chordee and do a proper closure.