hypogammaglobulinemia


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hypogammaglobulinemia

 [hi″po-gam″ah-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah]
abnormally low levels of all classes of immunoglobulins, associated with heightened susceptibility to infectious diseases; see also agammaglobulinemia, dysglobulinemia, and immunodeficiency.
common variable hypogammaglobulinemia common variable immunodeficiency.
physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia a normal period of hypogammaglobulinemia seen in all infants at about 5–6 months of age as the level of transplacentally acquired maternal immunoglobulins declines before endogenous immunoglobulin synthesis rises to normal levels.
transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy prolongation of the normal physiologic hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy caused by delayed development of endogenous immunoglobulin production and associated with increased susceptibility to infections.
X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă),
Decreased quantity of the gamma fraction of serum globulin; sometimes used loosely to denote decreased quantity of immunoglobulins in general; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobinemia

hypogammaglobulinemia

/hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·emia/ (-gam″ah-glob″u-lĭ-ne´me-ah) deficiency of all classes of immunoglobulins, as in agammaglobulinemia, dysglobulinemia, and immunodeficiency. This is normal for a short period in infants but should not be prolonged.hypogammaglobuline´mic
common variable hypogammaglobulinemia  see under immunodeficiency.

hypogammaglobulinemia

[-gam′əglō′byəlinē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + gamma, third letter in Greek alphabet; L, globus, small sphere; Gk, haima, blood
lower than normal concentration of plasma gamma globulin, usually the result of increased protein catabolism or loss of protein via the urine. It is associated with a decreased resistance to infection. Also spelled hypogammaglobulinaemia. Compare agammaglobulinemia.

hypogammaglobulinemia

Immunology A gallimaufry of conditions characterized by ↓ production of proteins, usually Igs, which migrate in the gamma region of a protein electrophoretic gel; hypogammaglobulinemia may be congenital, as in Bruton's disease, or other B-cell defects or acquired, as in CLL, and accompanied by monoclonal gammopathies Treatment Human immune globulin. See Immunodeficiency, B cell.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.

hy·po·gam·ma·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(hī'pō-gam'ă-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
Decreased gamma fraction of serum globulin; associated with increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections.
Synonym(s): hypogammaglobulinaemia.

hypogammaglobulinemia (hī´pō-gam´əglob´ūlinē´mēə),

n a deficiency of gammaglobulin, usually manifested by recurrent bacterial infections.

hypogammaglobulinemia

an immunological deficiency state marked by abnormally low levels of generally all classes of immunoglobulins, with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. It may be primary (called also inherited), or secondary (called also acquired), or it may be physiological. The latter occurs in normal neonates. See also agammaglobulinemia.
The young of most animal species are born hypogammaglobulinemic and remain so until they ingest maternal colostrum which has a high content of immunoglobulins. The ingestion must occur during the first 24-48 hours of life because the large molecules of the globulins are absorbed only during this period. Inadequate supply, or inadequate ingestion or absorption of the immunoglobulins results in prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia and puts the neonate at grave risk of life-threatening infections. This failure of passive antibody transfer is the most common immunodeficiency disease encountered in domestic animal species, especially foals and dairy calves.

transient hypogammaglobulinemia
occurs in some foals at 3 to 4 months of age because of a delayed onset of immunoglobulin synthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
22) In addition, CMV mononucleosis and pneumonia have been shown to precipitate hypogammaglobulinemia.
To confirm our observations, we used a hypoalbuminemic serum sample (35g/L, 47%) that also showed discrete hypogammaglobulinemia (8 g/L, 10%), which we diluted to a total protein content of 40 g/L (Fig.
Quantitative immunoglobulin studies revealed hypogammaglobulinemia with a serum IgG value of 456 mg/dL (normal, 700 to 1,700 mg/dL), IgA of 15 mg/dL (normal, 70 to 350 mg/dL), and 1gM of 19 mg/dL (normal, 50 to 300 mg/dL).
Low IgE levels have been reported in various forms of severe combined immunodeficiency, hyper-IgM syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, X-linked recessive Bruton agammaglobulinemia, common variable immunodeficiency, transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy, and isolated IgE deficiency whose clinical significance is unclear.
net 1,2,3,5,6,9 HYPERLIPODEMA See: Autoimmune Disorders HYPEROXALURIA See: Oxalosis & Hyperoxaluria HYPERTELORISM/ HYPOSPADIUS SYNDROMES See: Opitz Syndrome HYPERTHERMIA OF ANESTHESIA See: Malignant Hyperthermia HYPERTHYROID MYOPATHY See: Muscular Dystrophy; Thyroid Disorder HYPERURICEMIA-CHOREOATH ETOSIS-SELF-MUTILATION SYNDROME See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPERURICEMIA, HEREDITARY See: Lesch-Nyhan Disease HYPODONTIA AND NAIL DYSGENESIS See: Ectodermal Dysplasias HYPOERYTHEMIA, PROGRESSIVE See: Anemia, Aplastic HYPOGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA See: Immune Disorders HYPOMELANOSIS OF ITO See: Ectodermal Dysplasias; Epilepsy; Incontinentia Pigmenti; Vitiligo HYPOMYELINATION See: Myelin Disorders HYPOPARATHYROIDISM See also: Thyroid Disorders Hypoparathyroidism Newsletter 2835 Salmon St.
In MM, bone involvement in the thorax region and lung infections secondary to infections developing due to humoral immune deficiency related to hypogammaglobulinemia occur most frequently.
The CZE with the Capillarys showed hypogammaglobulinemia and a suspect peak in the (3-fraction (Fig.
Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous orphan condition characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and in some patients gastrointestinal manifestations such as chronic diarrhea and weight loss.
Although immunoglobulin levels in this case were tow but still detectable, whether the patient's illness was agamnaaglobulinemia or hypogammaglobulinemia is uncertain.
Our patient had a transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy, with severely low IgG and low IgA levels.