hypermobility


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Related to hypermobility: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Double jointed

hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-mō-bil'i-tē),
Increased range of movement of joints, and joint laxity, occurring normally in children and adolescents or as a result of disease, for example, Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

hypermobility

/hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty/ (-mo-bil´ĭ-te) greater than normal range of motion in a joint.hypermo´bile

hypermobility

[-mōbil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper, L, mobilis, movable
an abnormally wide range of movement of the joints. The condition is seen in children and may be associated with Marfan's syndrome.

hypermobility

Instability Orthopedics Any motion occurring in a joint in response to the reactive force of gravity at a time when that joint should be stable under such a load; hypermobility is often misused to describe extra movement as seen in a contortionist.

Hypermobility

Unusual flexibility of the joints, allowing them to be bent or moved beyond their normal range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive movement at a joint, which potentially leads to instability. This is as a result of changes to connective tissue, particularly collagen, which results in laxity of the supporting structures such as ligaments and tendons. There is a spectrum from the more serious, often genetic, conditions to the more common, which cause fewer problems but nevertheless increase the risk of injury. Hypermobility is assessed by the Beighton Score, which measures the degree of abnormal movement at the lower back, knees, elbows and hands. The higher the score (maximum 9), the more hypermobile an individual is. See also flexibility.

hypermobility,

n condition in which ligaments are loose; a click may be heard when the joint moves through a reasonable range of motion.

hypermobility

excessive mobility, as of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-six of the 72 subjects met criteria for joint hypermobility syndrome based on their Beighton hypermobility score, which awards points for the ability to bend one's thumb back so it's touching the forearm, bend the fifth finger back more than 90 degrees, and so forth.
Joint hypermobility among university students in Iraq.
A Hypermobility Syndrome Association spokeswoman said last night: "I have never heard of a child having all of these traits before.
Hypermobility of the tongue, on the other hand, appears to be a rather rare phenomenon.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a connective tissue disease with multiple subtypes, which produces joint hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility.
Earning training encourages employee loyalty to the organization, reduces the initial investment in training of new workers, reduces the costs to the agency of hypermobility, and allows employees of all generations to benefit from updated technological and theoretical information.
It was sobering to hear Parry's data on problems related to recurring injuries, injuries due to hypermobility, and dystonia suffered by several hundred pianists and orchestral musicians.
Two major components contribute to the etiology of SUT: urethral hypermobility or intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD).
For SI caused by hypermobility, the treatment is retropubic suspension, needle bladder neck suspension, or anterior vaginal repair.
Excessively soft surfaces may cause hypermobility of the joints, tendons, and muscles leading to overuse injuries.
The typical presentation of this syndrome is rather vague and nonspecific; fragile skin and mild joint hypermobility are the most common findings.