hydrophone

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hydrophone

[hī′drəfōn]
a small-diameter probe with a piezoelectric element, usually about 0.5 mm in diameter, at one end. When placed in an ultrasound beam, the hydrophone produces an electric signal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, he stresses that, unlike using hydrophones for detection, the technology to transmit AGWs remains a major obstacle, not least because of the vast complexities created by applying this theory to the real world, but also because of the immense energy which would be required (the 2004 earthquake and subsequent tsunami generated more than 1,500 times the energy released by the Hiroshima atomic bomb).
After deciding on sound intensity, JRC Tokki needed to integrate Bruel & Kjaer hydrophones into their sophisticated underwater measurement system.
The boat was instrumented with an acoustic receiver (Model MAP_600 RT, Lotek Wireless) and stereo hydrophones (Model LHP, Lotek Wireless) capable of detecting, identifying, and recording CDMA transmitter signals.
Underwater noise is measured with an underwater microphone known as a hydrophone.
A hydrophone could listen for whale calls all right, but these hydrophones hung on a mooring line "that clanked and yanked," said John Kemp, head of at-sea operations for the WHOI Mooring Operations, Engineering, and Field Support Group.
The hydrophones record the energy reflected back by the various rock strata beneath the sea floor.
In the 17 years we've been monitoring the ocean through hydrophone recordings, we've never seen a swarm of earthquakes in an area such as this," said Robert Dziak, a marine geologist with Oregon State University.
Modern hydrophones can be very sensitive but, because of their reliance on longitudinal pressure waves, are omnidirectional.
Ultrasonically tagged fish were detected in this estuarine area by means of wireless hydrophones deployed at four gates inside the entrance of the study area and farther up to tidal freshwater (38 km).
Within the range's boundaries, approximately 300 sensors, called hydrophones, will be embedded in the sea floor and connected via cables to track unit-level sonar training events.
The Attenuate sleeve isolated the hydrophones from radiated noise that emanates from other sections of the system.