tannin

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Related to Hydrolyzable tannins: condensed tannins

tannic acid

 [tan´ik]
a substance obtained from nutgalls, oak bark, and other plant parts, formerly used in medicine as an astringent. It is no longer used alone because it can be absorbed through mucous membranes or damaged skin in amounts sufficient to produce hepatic necrosis, although it is still used as a component of dermatological preparations.

tan·nin

(tan'in),
Any one of a group of complex nonuniform plant constituents that can be classified into hydrolyzable tannins (esters of a sugar, usually glucose, and one or several trihydroxybenzenecarboxylic acids) and condensed tannins (derivatives of flavonols). Tannins are used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine. Sometimes used synonymously with tannic acid. Tannins form black stains in the presence of iron.

tannin

/tan·nin/ (-in) tannic acid.

tannin

Herbal medicine
Any of a family of compounds that react with proteins to produce a leathery coating on animal tissues and give woods their brown, red and yellow hues; tannins are anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and astringent.

tan·nin

(tan'in)
A complex nonuniform plant constituent; used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine.

tannin

a complex organic compound occurring widely in plant sap, particularly in bark, leaves and unripe fruits, that is used in the production of leather and ink.

tan·nin

(tan'in)
Complex nonuniform plant constituent used in tanning, dyeing, photography, and as clarifying agents for beer and wine. Sometimes used synonymously with tannic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was, however, a nonsignificant trend for higher mortality of larvae due to virus at higher levels of hydrolyzable tannins (df = 1, 18; [R.
A one-way ANOVA detected significant differences between tannin levels in damaged and undamaged leaves for both hydrolyzable tannins (df = 1, 18; F = 4.
Total phenolics and hydrolyzable tannins remained low in 1994, whereas condensed tannin production was significantly higher for all species during the particularly wet summer.
Oak trees maintained higher levels of foliar N and hydrolyzable tannins, whereas maple leaves were especially low in N content, but higher in condensed tannin production.
In contrast, hydrolyzable tannins generally failed to show this canopy/understory relationship.
Past reports of seasonal increases in condensed tannins and corresponding decreases in hydrolyzable tannins (Baldwin et al.
The high levels of leaf stripping and skeletonizing damage on oaks occurred despite relatively low levels of foliar N (Coley and Aide 1991, Garten 1993) and high concentrations of total phenolics and/or hydrolyzable tannins.
The combination of higher leaf N (oaks) and continued reductions in total phenols and hydrolyzable tannins in 1994 may have promoted greater damage by strip feeders on oak and maple trees, and by skeletonizers on chestnut oaks.
Plant chemical assays were performed to determine foliar N content, total phenols, and condensed and hydrolyzable tannin concentrations.
The failure of total phenol and hydrolyzable tannin levels to rebound following drought might reflect a preferential utilization of carbon for growth over differentiation as soil N uptake increased during high rainfall in 1994 (Bryant et al.
Isolation and characterization of hydrolyzable tannins from Mallotus japonicus (THUNB.
Nobotanins G, H and I, dimeric hydrolyzable tannins from Heterocentron roseum.