phosphate

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phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.

phosphate

/phos·phate/ (fos´fāt) any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.phosphat´ic

phosphate (PO43-)

[fos′fāt]
1 an anion of phosphoric acid.
2 a salt of phosphoric acid. Phosphates are extremely important in living cells, particularly in the storage and use of energy and the transmission of genetic information within a cell and from one cell to another. See also adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus.

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism

phosphate

any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.
1. Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces, and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are used to store the chemical bond energy released during the oxidation of compounds such as glycogen or fatty acids, which may later be expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine and certain other body compounds. See also hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphatemia.
2. used extensively in agricultural industry as fertilizers and organic compounds as cleaning agents.

phosphate binders
usually aluminum carbonate or hydroxide preparations, used to bind phosphates and limit their absorption from the intestine. Used in the treatment of the hyperphosphatemia of renal failure.
phosphate buffer
important phosphate-containing buffers.
phosphate buffered saline
a special phosphate buffered saline used in tissue cultures and for the storage and transport of bovine embryos. Abbreviated PBS.
phosphate calculi
see struvite urolith.
dietary phosphate
supplementation of the diet with phosphate in some form is a very common practice in farm animals. Materials used include rock phosphate (defluorination may be necessary), sodium dihydrogen phosphate produced by the agricultural chemical industry, calcium triphosphate and bone meal or flour.
inorganic phosphate
any salt of phosphoric acid.
phosphate retention
a phenomenon resulting from reduced glomerular filtration; contributes to a chronic hypocalcemic state.
phosphate ridge
see mineralization front.
phosphate rock
phosphate yielding endonucleases
a class of ribonuclease involved in the usually fairly rapid turnover of RNA in the cell that degrades RNA by cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds within the molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the addition of ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source and di potassium hydrogen phosphate as a source of phosphorus has caused an increase in the percentage of removal of pollutants from the soil by bacteria.
Commercially available starting materials were purchased from suppliers and used without furher purifications as follows: diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(N[H.
No ITP was added to these samples, and they were treated with perchloric acid and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate solution without incubation.
Gelatinous precipite treated with ammonium hydrogen phosphate at 800[degrees] C for 1 hr.
73 g of monosodium hydrogen phosphate and 9 g of sodium chloride in 1L distilled water.
The mobile phase (flow rate, 1 mL/min) consisted of 10 mmol/L diammonium hydrogen phosphate adjusted to pH 2.
Wet chemical methods involve the acid-base titration or co-precipitation from aqueous solutions that contain calcium nitrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate, direct precipitation reaction between orthophosphoric acid solution and calcium hydroxide dispersed in water.
Tenders are invited for Supply of PH 4 Butter tablet/Capsule, PH 7 Butter tablet/Capsule, Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate, Di Potassium Hydrogen Phosphate K2HP04,Di Potassium Hydrogen Phosphate Na2 HP04, Ammonium Chloride NH4CL2,Magnesium Sulphate MgSO4 7H2O,Calcium ChlorideCaCl2,Feric Chloride FEc13 6H2O,Con.
Tenders are invited for Di-Sodium Hydrogen Phosphate Na2hpo4 Make: Merck / Thomas Baker / Qualigens / Rankem / Hi-Media / Lobo / Ranbaxy Or Similar
Tenders are invited for Potassium Hydrogen Phosphate K2hpo4 Make: Merck / Thomas Baker / Qualigens / Rankem / Hi-Media / Lobo / Ranbaxy Or Similar

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