excitement phase

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excitement phase

The first phase of Masters’ and Johnson’s four-stage model of physiological responses to sexual stimulation. It is triggered by erotic physical or mental stimulation resulting in sexual arousal (in the form of erection in the male and increased vaginal lubrication in the female).
References in periodicals archive ?
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can adversely affect all aspects of the human sexual response cycle.
Masters and Johnson are perhaps best remembered for their early research on the physical changes undergone by the human body during sexual activity, which they dubbed the human sexual response cycle.
In terms of the short-term impact of smoking on sexual function, it is important to understand that the physical aspects of the arousal phase of the human sexual response cycle (i.
For both men and women, smoking is most likely to have an impact of the arousal phase of the human sexual response cycle.
In sum, the available scientific research indicates that higher amounts of alcohol intake have an immediate short-term negative impact on the arousal and orgasm phases of the human sexual response cycle.
In sum, the available scientific literature indicates that heavy drinking can have a long-term negative impact on the arousal and orgasm phases of the human sexual response cycle for women and on the desire, arousal, and orgasm phases for men.
As a practicing urologist, sex researcher and clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of sexual complaints, she has a great vantage point from which to evaluate claims that sex and a whole series of phenomena associated with it--desire, erections, orgasms, "the human sexual response cycle," intercourse, even sexual pleasure itself--are timeless, universal and readily definable aspects of human biology.
at a recent conference on "Emerging Concepts in Women's Health," sexology has pursued a path of treating male and female functioning as similar, as evidenced by Masters and Johnson's development of the human sexual response cycle.
It is from this perspective that Tiefer criticizes some of the best-known lab studies, notably the work of Masters and Johnson on the Human Sexual Response Cycle.

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