Herpesviridae

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Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(her'pēs-vir'i-dē),
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies. Virions are enveloped, ether sensitive, and vary up to 200 nm in diameter; the nucleocapsids are 100 nm in diameter and of icosahedral symmetry, with 162 capsomeres. The family is subdivided into three subfamilies Alphaherpesvirinae, Betaherpesvirinae, and Gammaherpesvirinae, and includes herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (all of which infect humans), pseudorabies virus of swine, equine rhinopneumonitis virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, canine herpesvirus, B virus of Old World monkeys, several viruses of New World monkeys, virus III of rabbits, infectious laryngotracheitis virus of fowl, Marek disease virus of chickens, Lucké tumor virus of frogs, and many others.

Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(hĕrpēz-viri-dē)
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies.

Herpesviridae

(hər″pēzvi´rô ide),
n one of the major virus families, to which the herpes simplex, varicella zoster, and Epstein-Barr viruses belong. Viruses in this family have a double-stranded linear molecular structure with icosahedral symmetry.

Herpesviridae

a family of viruses, the members of which are about 150 nm in diameter, enveloped, with a nucleocapsid of about 100 nm in diameter, composed of 162 capsomers and contain a large, double-stranded DNA. The viruses replicate in the nucleus of the infected cell, where they induce the formation of a characteristic inclusion body; some also induce formation of a cytoplasmic inclusion body. The herpesviruses are classified into three subfamilies: (1) Alphaherpesvirinae, which are rapidly growing viruses that cause acute diseases, except Marek's disease which causes tumors in chickens; (2) Betaherpesvirinae, which are slow growing, highly cell-associated viruses, also called cytomegaloviruses, which produce subtle diseases with a prolonged clinical course; and (3) Gammaherpesvirinae, some of which produce low grade, prolonged clinical illness typified by infectious mononucleosus/glandular fever of humans, caused by Epstein-Barr virus, and probably a similar disease of horses caused by equine herpesvirus 2; the primate viruses are associated with tumors.
The important diseases of animals caused by herpesviruses are dealt with under their individual headings: aujeszky's disease, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, equine viral abortion, equine viral rhinopneumonitis, equine coital exanthema, equine herpesvirus 2 infection, the Allerton form of lumpy-skin disease, the generalized infection of cattle with bovine herpesvirus 2, bovine herpes mammillitis, the African 'wildebeest-associated' malignant catarrhal fever, canine herpesvirus respiratory, genital and neonatal infections, feline viral rhinotracheitis. In birds there are infectious laryngotracheitis, pigeon herpesvirus, duck plague and marek's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV) family members other than HHV-6 in drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.
Human herpesvirus 8: seroprevalence and correlates in prostitutes in Mombasa, Kenya.
Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) disease in the setting of transplantation.
Human herpesvirus 6 and 7 DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes and plasma in patients with pityriasis rosea by polymerase chain reaction a prospective case control study.
1) It is characteristically associated with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) infection; coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is commonly found.
Teraki Y, Murota H, Izaki S: Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to zonisamide associated with reactivation of human herpesvirus 6.
Common viral sexually transmitted infections include the herpes viruses CMV, EBV, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), and human herpesvirus types 6, 7, and 8 (HHV-6, HHV-7, HHV-8) (Table 1).
For this study, Kaur and her colleagues used glioma cell lines, oncolytic viruses derived from human herpesvirus type 1 (HSV-1), and glioblastoma animal models.
These have included the measles virus, (15) parainfluenza virus, human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6), EBV, canine distemper virus and retroviruses.
The human herpesvirus 8 cytokine receptor vGPCR triggers autonomous pro;liferation of endothelial cells, J Clin Invest 2006;116:1264-1273.