consciousness

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consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

/con·scious·ness/ (-nes)
1. the state of being conscious.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. the conscious.

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.

consciousness

[kon′shəsnes]
a clear state of awareness of self and the environment in which attention is focused on immediate matters, as distinguished from mental activity of an unconscious or subconscious nature.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness,

n a state in which the individual is capable of rational response to questioning and has all protective reflexes intact, including the ability to maintain a patent airway.

consciousness

the state of being conscious; responsiveness of the brain to impressions made by the senses. Altered states range from the normal, complete alertness to depression, confusion, delirium and finally loss of consciousness.
References in periodicals archive ?
For those of us who are less knowledgeable in biology, the later chapters on vision and human consciousness are somewhat less accessible, and perhaps less interesting, since major breakthroughs in understanding eluded Crick.
Eliade, Jung, and Campbell function as foils for Frye: the exposure of their limitations serves to foreground Frye's contribution of a "Blakean theory of myth" that is authentically phenomenological in the priority it gives to the active, creative agency of human consciousness in the critical understanding of myth.
Ehrlich explores "silla" the Inuit idea that weather and human consciousness are bound up together.
HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS IN ITS developed, temporally extended form is narratively structured.
Human consciousness has the capacity to watch the human mind.
In "The African Heritage of African American Art and Performance," Babatunde Lawal argues that "visual and performing arts have been an integral part of African cultures since the dawn of human consciousness.
We also hurt one another and shoot and kill one another because there seems to be some storm that happens in human consciousness.
Because Memling fails to embrace the representation of nature, he is accused of impeding the progress of art toward an ideal of individuated self-realization; Hugo on the other hand, though his late paintings are anti-realist, embodies the teleological principle that genius secures progress by trumping cultural expectations, giving expression to new stages of human consciousness.
Husserl was bogged down in the curious nineteenth-century project of trying to discover what human consciousness is by stripping it to the simplest, purest perception of a stream, a flow of external time, usually in the contemplation of a musical tone.
David Lodge does not attempt to answer this question but suggests that poetry, drama and literature are 'a record of human consciousness, the richest and most comprehensive we have'.
Hobson spoke on "Dream Science and Human Consciousness.
Of late Tyson, in the guise of both outsider artist and outsider scientist, has been hubristically, but somehow movingly, preoccupied with representing ideas of infinity as expressed in the cosmos, the subatomic, and the minutiae of human consciousness.

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