Howell-Jolly bodies


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How·ell-Jol·ly bod·ies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē'),
spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes, especially in stained preparations (as compared with wet unstained films); probably represent nuclear remnants, staining with dyes that are rather specific for chromatin; the significance of the bodies is not exactly known; they occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.
Synonym(s): Jolly bodies

Howell-Jolly bodies

[hou′əl jol′ē]
Etymology: William H. Howell, American physiologist, 1860-1945; Justin M.J. Jolly, French histologist, 1870-1953
deep purple spherical erythrocyte nucleic acid inclusions observed on microscopic examination of stained blood films. They are most commonly seen in people who have hemolytic or megoblastic anemia, leukemia, thalassemia, or congenital absence of the spleen and in those who have had a splenectomy.
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Howell-Jolly bodies

How·ell-Jol·ly bo·dies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē' bod'ēz)
Spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.

Howell,

William, U.S. physiologist, 1860-1945.
Howell-Jolly bodies - spherical or ovoid eccentrically located granules occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes that occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia. Synonym(s): Jolly bodies
Howell unit - equivalent approximately to 0.002 mg of pure heparin. Synonym(s): heparin unit

Jolly,

Justin, French histologist, 1870-1953.
Howell-Jolly bodies - see under Howell
Jolly bodies - Synonym(s): Howell-Jolly bodies

Howell-Jolly bodies

small, round or oval bodies, probably nuclear remnants, seen in erythrocytes when stains are added to fresh blood and found in various anemias and after splenectomy or reduced splenic function.
References in periodicals archive ?
The abnormally high number of Howell-Jolly bodies in our patient was indicative of altered splenic function.
Howell-Jolly bodies (Figure IV) are present in up to 1 per cent of the cells.