hospice

(redirected from Hospitium)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hospice

 [hos´pis]
originally, a medieval guest house or way station for pilgrims and travelers. The term is currently used to designate either a place or a philosophy of care for persons in the last stages of life and their families. For decades there have been hospices in England, free-standing facilities unaffiliated with hospitals and autonomous in terms of professional procedures. These hospices were the predecessors of the hospices now found in the United States.

A hospice program provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families. The concept of hospice is that of a caring community of professional and nonprofessional people, supplemented by volunteer services. The emphasis is on dealing with emotional and spiritual problems as well as medical problems. Of primary concern is control of pain and other symptoms, on keeping the patient at home for as long as possible or desirable, and on making his or her remaining days as comfortable and meaningful as possible. After the patient dies family members are given support throughout their period of bereavement.

hos·pice

(hos'pis),
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available in the home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

/hos·pice/ (hos´pis) a facility that provides palliative and supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families, either directly or on a consulting basis.

hospice

(hŏs′pĭs)
n.
1. A shelter or lodging for travelers, pilgrims, foundlings, or the destitute, especially one maintained by a monastic order.
2. A program that provides palliative care and attends to the emotional and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients at an inpatient facility or at the patient's home.

hospice

[hos′pis]
Etymology: L, hospes, host
a system of family-centered care designed to assist the terminally ill person to be comfortable and to maintain quality of life through the phases of dying. Hospice care is multidisciplinary and includes home visits, professional health care available on call, teaching and emotional support of the family, and physical care of the client. Some hospice programs provide care in a center, as well as in the home or in a nursing home. Hospice also offers bereavement counseling for the family. See also emotional care of the dying patient, stages of dying.

hospice

A residential or institutional palliative care unit in the UK which provides planned, co-ordinated, multidisciplinary care for the terminally ill and their carers. Hospices are often run by charitable organisations with which NHS Boards may have contractual arrangements for providing patient care.

Services provided
Inpatient and day care, home care, respite care and specialist advice.

Professions associated with hospices
Medical, nursing, allied health professionals, social work and chaplains/ministers of religion.

hospice

Managed care An institution which provides comfort care and a combination of inpatient, outpatient, and home health services–pain relief, symptom management and support, for terminally ill Pts (and their families) with CA, AIDS and other dread diseases. See Comfort care.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
An institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying patients and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care; such services are provided by an interdisciplinary team of professionals and volunteers who are available to provide assistance at home and in specialized inpatient settings.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice

A hospital specializing in the care of the terminally ill. Hospices are dedicated to providing the physical, emotional and psychological support and expert pain management needed to help the dying to accept the reality of death and to die in dignity and peace of mind.

hospice,

n system for care of a patient during the final phases of a terminal illness, often involving family, emotional support, and professional health care in the patient's home.

hos·pice

(hos'pis)
Institution that provides a centralized program of palliative and supportive services to dying people and their families, in the form of physical, psychological, social, and spiritual care.
[L. hospitium, hospitality, lodging, fr. hospes, guest]

hospice (hos´pis),

n a program under medical direction and nurse coordination that provides a variety of inpatient and home care for individuals who are terminally ill and their family members; provides calming and accommodating care that meets the special needs arising from the variety of stresses experienced during the final phases of illness, death, and grieving (e.g., emotional, physical, social, economic, and spiritual).
References in periodicals archive ?
When they ended Eusebius's program, his nemeses invaded his hospitium and scattered "everything which was of value or which was prepared for the poor" (see appendix, stage 9).
The term hospitium covers a range of meanings, from hostels for travelers or lodging places more generally.
It is true that he mentions a foray by a throng that dragged him from hospitium one.
Under the common law an innkeeper was an insurer of property, infra hospitium [within the hotel facility], of his guests, and liable for the loss thereof or damage thereto unless the loss was caused by negligence of the guest, act of God, or the public enemy.
For the particular form of Roman-Iberian hospitium, see Richardson (note 17, 1996) 156-58.
Realia sold one hotel property in Norrkoping for SEK31m and one in Karlstad for SEK24m, while at the same time acquiring four office and commercial properties in Mariestad from Hospitium Fastigheter for SEK26m.
El patronatum y el hospitium eran dos instituciones que representaban culturas diferentes.
D'ors ha deducido del estudio de las tablas de hospitalidad y patronazgo que el hospitium fue la forma mas prontamente adoptada en Hispania para revestir un tipo de alianzas publicas que eran tradicionales entre los celtas.
Como es sabido, la palabra 'hospitalidad', al igual que otras como 'hospital' u 'hotel', proviene del latin hospitium (alojamiento), que a su vez parece derivar del indoeuropeo ospes.
Segun autores como Balbin o Humbert (citados por Korstanje, 2010), el hospitium romano tenia un aspecto publico, la cesion de ciertos derechos a los viajeros de otras comunidades, y tambien uno privado, limitado a grupos familiares o a los propios sujetos individuales.
El hospitium militare invernal en ciudades peregrinas y los abusos de la hospitalidad sub tectis durante la Republica>>, DHA 27, 2, 2001, pp.
Analizza quindi con originalita ma anche con uno stile rapido numerose parole-chiave come pax, bellum, hostis, hospitium, amicitia, foedus prendendo in esame numerosi autori romani, fra cui segnatamente Virgilio.