Horner syndrome


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Related to Horner syndrome: Pancoast tumor

Horner syndrome

 [hor´ner]
sinking in of the eyeball, ptosis of the upper eyelid, slight elevation of the lower lid, constriction of the pupil, narrowing of the palpebral fissure, and anhidrosis caused by paralysis of the cervical sympathetic nerve supply.

Hor·ner syn·drome

(hōr'nĕr), [MIM*143000]
ipsilateral myosis, ptosis, and facial anhydrosis; usually unilateral and due to an ipsilateral lesion of the cervical sympathetic chain or its central pathway; an ominous sign when it accompanies an ipsilateral traumatic brachial plexopathy because it usually indicates an avulsion of the C8 and T1 primary roots from the spinal cord.

Horner syndrome

Bernard-Horner syndrome, Horner's ptosis Neurology
A clinical complex consisting of the sinking in of one eyeball, ipsilateral ptosis and miosis, anhidosis and flushing of affected side of face Etiology Paralysis of cervical sympathetic nerves

Hor·ner syn·drome

(hōr'nĕr sin'drōm)
Ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis on the side of a sympathetic palsy. Enophthalmos is more apparent than real. The affected pupil is visibly slow to dilate in dim light; due to a lesion of the cervical sympathetic chain or its central pathways.

Horner,

Johann Friedrich, Swiss ophthalmologist, 1831-1886.
Bernard-Horner syndrome - Synonym(s): Horner syndrome
Horner pupil - constricted pupil due to impairment of sympathetic nerve innervation of the dilator muscle of the pupil.
Horner syndrome - ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis on the side of the sympathetic palsy. Synonym(s): Bernard-Horner syndrome; Bernard syndrome; ptosis sympathetica
Horner-Trantas dots - evanescent white cellular infiltrates occurring in the bulbar form of vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

Hor·ner syn·drome

(hōr'nĕr sin'drōm) [MIM*143000]
Ipsilateral myosis, ptosis, and facial anhydrosis due to ipsilateral lesion of cervical sympathetic chain or its central pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, we present a series of three clinical cases of Horner syndrome in pregnant patients that received epidural analgesia for labor.
After neurological exploration, a motor deficit was observed (level 3 on the Medical Research Council scale) that included the entire upper limb, as well as unspecific soreness at the ipsilateral ocular level with evidence of ptosis, myosis, and anhidrosis compatible with Horner syndrome.
After the beginning of the cesarean section, a clinical presentation suggesting Horner syndrome was observed (see Fig.
The clinical presentation of Horner syndrome is inconspicuous and can go unnoticed, with some authors affirming that it can go unobserved in 75% of births by cesarean section that use this anesthetic method.
Ocular effects of apraclonidine in Horner syndrome.
The use of apraclonidine in the diagnosis of Horner syndrome in pediatric patients.
Positive apraclonidine test within two weeks of onset of Horner syndrome caused by carotid artery dissection.
Adverse effects of apraclonidine used in the diagnosis of Horner syndrome in infants.
On examination, she displayed mydriasis and slight ptosis, findings that are suggestive of both Horner syndrome and Pourfour du Petit syndrome.
The development of Horner syndrome (ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis) is an expected outcome in almost all patients, and therefore it warrants preoperative discussion.
3,4) Pourfour du Petit syndrome occasionally precedes Horner syndrome (3) Our case was complicated by the fact that our patient exhibited characteristics of both syndromes, possibly during a transition period from Pourfour du Petit to Homer.
1,2) Depending on the size and location of the aneurysm, the direction of its growth, and the specific adjacent structures involved, possible signs and symptoms include headaches, epistaxis, avascular retrotympanic mass with hemotympanum and/or otorrhagia, pulsatile tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo, and Horner syndrome or Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia.