homonym

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homonym

(hŏm′ə-nĭm′, hō′mə-)
n.
1. One of two or more words that have the same sound and often the same spelling but differ in meaning, such as bank (embankment) and bank (place where money is kept).
2.
a. A word used to designate several different things.
b. A namesake.
3. Biology A taxonomic name identical to one previously applied to a different species or other taxon and therefore unacceptable in its new use.

hom′o·nym′ic adj.

homonym

a specific or generic name that has been used for two or more different organisms. The homonym published first is designated as ‘senior’, and ‘junior’ if published last.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name Sarcocornietum perennis of the Canarian association is a later homonym of the Cuban name Salicornietum perennis (Art.
Now, homonyms will have matching labels but different IRIs and will not cause spurious inferences.
Although there are some differences among authorities in the definitions of homphone, homonym, and oronym, the resultant problems--and humor--remain.
This publication culminates with an illustration which cleverly highlights every homonym cited in the text.
Although von Humboldt understood the meaning of the term "chino" as applied in Mexico at the time, he failed to realize that he was dealing with homonyms of "chino" when he mentioned that it was "strange" to call Afrodescendants "Chinese.
In addition, the system must also be able to properly interpret homonym variants spoken by the user.
two primes accelerated the identification of word homonyms two times as strongly as each of them individually.
I then examine the relationship of this phrase to his homonyms, to significata having the same "name" that are "related to one and the same thing," and to "is said homonymously.
And, as The Register-Guard noted, spell-check will not identify or correct grammar, punctuation or capitalization problems or the incorrect use of homonyms such as "their," "there" and "they're.
Here Wiley announced another major concern: language's maze--reversals (as in spoonerisms), homonyms, puns, and so forth.
The authors seem to favor long lists for example the one of "Technical Words & Phrases" that constitutes most of Section XII: Technology or the list of "Nyms"--antonyms synonyms and homonyms on pages 110-114.
The historic fracture/healing of Europe is stressed in playful linguistic de- and reconstructions that span from the philosophical to the trivial, unlocking new meaning through hyphenations, homonyms, and neologisms, for example "ex-odus" and "chaocosmic.