Homans' sign

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Homans' sign

 [ho´manz]
discomfort behind the knee on forced dorsiflexion of the foot; a sign of thrombosis in the lower limb.

Homans' sign

Etymology: John Homans, American surgeon, 1877-1954; L, signum, mark
pain in the calf with dorsiflexion of the foot, indicating thrombophlebitis or thrombosis. It is not, however, a reliable indicator of either medical problem.

Homans' sign

Orthopedics Pain in back of calf or knee when the foot is dorsiflexed, which is typically associated with thrombosis in veins of calf. See Deep vein thrombosis.

Homans' sign

The eliciting of a sharp pain in the calf and behind the knee by passively forcing the foot backwards (dorsiflexion). This is an indication of deep vein THROMBOSIS in the calf. The test is now regarded as dangerous as it may dislodge an EMBOLUS. (John Homans, 1877–1954, American surgeon)