Hollander test

Hollander test

 [hol´an-der]
a gastric function test that measures the response of gastric secretory cells to insulin-induced hypoglycemia; used to evaluate the completeness of a vagotomy.

Hol·land·er test

(hol'ăn-dĕr),
rarely used test, involving insulin-induced hypoglycemia that stimulates gastric acid secretion in patient with an intact vagus nerve.

Hollander test

A near extinct test for the completeness of vagotomy. The observation that hypoglycaemia stimulates gastric acid secretion prompted Hollander to use insulin-induced hypoglycaemia to identify persistent vagal innervation after gastric surgery. Central to this test is the dubious assumption that acid secretion induced by hypoglycaemia is mediated solely by the vagal axis. False-positive results are frequent, particularly when the test is performed in the early postoperative period, and the predictive value of this test for postoperative recurrence is poor. The Hollander test is also dangerous, especially for elderly patients—seizures, myocardial infarctions and deaths have been reported. For these reasons, the insulin (Hollander) test has fallen out of favour.

Hollander,

Franklin, U.S. physiologist, 1899-1966.
Hollander test - a test to determine the completeness of vagotomy for peptic ulcer. Synonym(s): insulin hypoglycemia test