Holiday Blues

(redirected from Holiday Depression)
Feelings of sadness, loneliness, depression and anxiety in and around the holidays, caused by loss of family and loved ones through divorce or distance from the childhood home or place where the holidays were most enjoyed in years past
References in periodicals archive ?
She said one person she knew decided to face holiday depression head-on by sending a text of gratitude each day for 12 days as a "12 Days of Christmas" gratitude-a-thon.
Moll suggested some tips which you can follow to prevent normal holiday depression from progressing into chronic depression.
Holiday depression is often thought to be related to feelings of loneliness, separation from loved ones or memories of times that were more enjoyable and meaningful for the individual Getting through the holidays can be especially difficult for senior citizens who may be more prone to loneliness.
The common symptoms of holiday depression are the same ones that characterize depression in general.
Symptoms of holiday depression may also include changes in sleep patterns, anxiety, restlessness, feelings of worthlessness or hopelessness, irritability, loss of interest in activities you usually enjoy, or crying for no reason.
LANCASTER - Seniors don't have to be plagued by holiday depression, according to Judith Harris.
Branded post-Bank Holiday depression syndrome, 73 per cent of those questioned supported the move to bring the rest of Britain in line with Scotland and have an extra day off to recover from New Year.
Cary Cooper, professor of Organisational Psychology and Health at UMIST, Manchester said: 'People who start work on January 2 feeling tired after their New Year festivities could end up suffering from acute post-Bank Holiday depression syndrome as a result because they are returning before they are fully revitalised.
Holiday depression, a common phenomenon, may play a role in exacerbating a heart condition.
The best advice for chasing away winter or holiday depression, experts say, is to get busy doing something.
One sure sign that the Christmas season has begun is the annual crop of articles about holiday depression, which appear as reliably as department-store Santas and fruitcakes.
Drag a fat and pampered evergreen into your home, and you may be dealing yourself a dose of the Holiday Depression Syndrome.