Hodgkin disease


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Hodg·kin dis·ease

(hoj'kin),
a disease marked by chronic enlargement of the lymph nodes, often local at the onset and later generalized, together with enlargement of the spleen and often of the liver, no pronounced leukocytosis, and commonly anemia and continuous or remittent (Pel-Ebstein) fever; considered to be a malignant neoplasm of lymphoid cells of uncertain origin (Reed-Sternberg cells), associated with inflammatory infiltration of lymphocytes and eosinophilic leukocytes and fibrosis; can be classified into lymphocytic predominant, nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, and lymphocytic depletion types; a similar disease occurs in domestic cats.
Synonym(s): Hodgkin lymphoma, lymphadenoma (2)

Hodg·kin dis·ease

(hoj'kin di-zēz')
A disease marked by chronic enlargement of the lymph nodes, often local at the onset and later generalized, together with enlargement of the spleen and often of the liver, no pronounced leukocytosis, and commonly anemia and continuous or remittent (Pel-Ebstein) fever; considered to be a malignant neoplasm of lymphoid cells of uncertain origin (Reed-Sternberg cells), associated with inflammatory infiltration of lymphocytes and eosinophilic leukocytes and fibrosis; can be classified into lymphocytic predominant, nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity, and lymphocytic depletion type; a similar disease occurs in domestic cats.

Hodgkin,

Thomas, English physician, 1798-1866.
Hodgkin disease - malignant neoplasm of lymphoid cells of uncertain origin, associated with inflammatory infiltration of lymphocytes and eosinophilic leukocytes and fibrosis. Synonym(s): lymphadenoma
Hodgkin-Key murmur - a musical diastolic murmur.
Hodgkin sarcoma
non-Hodgkin lymphoma - a lymphoma other than Hodgkin disease.

Hodg·kin dis·ease

(hoj'kin di-zēz')
Disease marked by chronic enlargement of the lymph nodes, often local at the onset and later generalized, together with enlargement of the spleen and often of the liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, an association of GHCD with the nodular lymphocyte-predominant form of Hodgkin disease has not been reported previously.
Perhaps more detailed examination of immunoglobulin rearrangements in cases such as ours and the cases reported by Di Benedetto et al[4] and Westin et al[17] may lead to a better understanding of the possible clonal relationship between Hodgkin disease and composite or sequential "non-Hodgkin" B-cell lymphoproliferative processes such as GHCD.
Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin disease represent clonal populations of germinal center-derived tumor B cells.
Because primary gastrointestinal Hodgkin disease cases are so rare, and those arising in Crohn disease are even rarer, the diagnosis should only be made following strict histologic and other criteria proposed by Dawson et al[10]: (a) no superficial lymphadenopathy should be present at the time of diagnosis; (b) chest radiological studies should indicate no involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes; (c) the complete blood count and white cell differential should be within normal limits; (d) gastrointestinal lesion should predominate with or without positive adjacent lymph nodes; and (e) liver and spleen should be free of disease at the time of diagnosis.
4-6] In 1977, Codling et al[11] reported a case of Hodgkin disease complicating Crohn colitis.
Our case fulfills the criteria of Dawson et al[10] and the immunohistochemical criteria for the diagnosis of primary gastrointestinal Hodgkin disease.
The presence of infiltration of lymph node sinuses by tumor cells, phagocytosis of neutrophils by tumor cells, and marked anaplasia or the presence of spindle-shaped tumor cells are more common in carcinoma than Hodgkin disease.
Immunohistochemical stains are essential in establishing the correct diagnosis of the syncytial variant of nodular sclerosing Hodgkin disease.
In conclusion, the syncytial variant of nodular sclerosing Hodgkin disease is an uncommon entity, which may histologically resemble a diverse group of malignancies.