Hispanic

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adjective Referring to any of 17 major Latino subcultures, concentrated in California, Texas, Chicago, Miami, NYC and elsewhere
noun A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race

Hispanic

Multiculture A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race Social medicine Any of 17 major Latino subcultures, concentrated in California, Texas, Chicago, Miam, NY, and elsewhere
References in periodicals archive ?
By the turn of the seventeenth century, Inca gender ideologies had been sufficiently Hispanicized as to tip the delicate balance of power between the sexes in favor of male privilege.
For the most Hispanicized and Christian members of Indian society the crosses were to be a gift of encouragement; here was God's most powerful sign, his holy brand upon another part of his world.
Mexico was, of course, silver-rich, and "credit backed by silver was what made the Hispanicized economy work" (92).
nicknamed Peter, Petey, or in his mother's Hispanicized English,
These early writers were of colonial descent and represent the hispanicized blacks who were descendants of slaves.
Because of Catholic influence, Hispanicized people often reject what is not heterosexual and male, although the majority of Indigenous people are traditionally respectful of two-spirit people as a group.
Each participant assigned a gender to 20 potential English non-words, selecting either the masculine or feminine definite article after reading the item (which included a definition) and attempting a Hispanicized pronunciation of the term in question.
Sanches added to her 1631 testimony to New Mexico's agent of the Inquisition that ten or twelve years prior, Hispanicized (ladino) Mexican Indian Beatris de los Angeles, wife of the alferez Juan de la Cruz, visited her.
population becomes increasingly Hispanicized, interpretations of the game's history may become more accommodating of this audience, as the last segment of Burns's documentary -- with ballplaying Dominican immigrants in New York City -- appropriately showed.
Tom Cummins (1994), on the other hand, documents Andean transformations of their modes of representation based on geometric abstraction to use more literal and Europeanized systems of communication and Hispanicized modes of visual representation in order to preserve their historical memory in a colonial context in which natives were losing their access to their own cultural symbols.
The use of foreign terms to refer to Indian places is common; after all the term Navajo is a Spanish label for a people who call themselves Dine, and the term Pima is a Hispanicized mis-label for people who call themselves O'odham.
In the 1920s, the community of thirty thousand or so Puerto Rican migrants was dominated numerically by a skilled working class and culturally by a small Hispanicized professional elite, some of whom coped with their concerns about North American racism by "passing" for Spanish.