Hirudo


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Hirudo

(hi-rū'dō),
A genus of leeches (class Hirudinea, family Gnathobdellidae). Species previously used in medicine are: Hirudo australis, Australian leech; Hirudo decora, American leech; Hirudo interrupta or Hirudo troctina, a North African leech; Hirudo medicinalis, speckled, Swedish, or German leech, the species previously in most general use; Hirudo m. officinalis, a variety of the preceding; Hirudo provincialis, the green or Hungarian leech; Hirudo quinquestriata, five-striped leech.
[L. leech]

Hirudo

/Hi·ru·do/ (hĭ-roo´do) [L.] a genus of leeches, including H. medicina´lis, which have been used extensively for drawing blood.

Hi·ru·do

(hi-rū'dō)
A genus of leeches; used in traditional medicine for blood letting or as an antithrombin.
[L. leech]

Hirudo

a genus of leeches in the class Hirudinea.

Hirudo medicinalis
up to 5 inches long and 1 inch diameter, this greenish leech may attach to animals. Used medicinally.
References in periodicals archive ?
escherichii, whereas in the downstream (after the Enne Dam Lake), it followed the order EPP diatom frustules > Hirudo sp.
1) Hirudin is a 65-amino-acid polypeptide first derived from the saliva of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, and is the prototype direct thrombin inhibitor.
In the reattachment of severed body parts, for example, Hirudo medicinalis often saves the day by preventing renewed blood flow from overwhelming the reattached appendage.
1993 "A Fast Activating Presynaptic Reuptake Current During Serotonergic Transmission, Identified Neurons of Hirudo.
The Root-Bernsteins also take a look at the tiny creatures that dwell inside the earth, bringing into the spotlight an unexpectedly user-friendly little worm, Hirudo medici nalis.
The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an ideal model for studying the basic processes behind neural regeneration, she notes.
Based on physiological studies of photoreceptors in Hirudo medicinalis (Kretz et al.
sinensis radix (dang gui), Chuanxiong rhizoma (chuan xiong), Changii radix (ming clang shen), Adenophorae radix (nan sha shen), and Alismatis Rhizome (ze xie); (2) TCMs from the organs of animals that contain certain amount of proteins, fat, and amino acid, such as the Hippocampus (hai ma), Syngnathus (hal long), Eupolyphaga steleophaga (tu bie chong), and Hirudo (shui zhi); and (3) medicines with appearance, color, and odor that can be easily altered by the surroundings, such as L.
Symbiosis of Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria and Hirudo medicine's, the medicinal leech: a novel model for digestive tract associations.
The saliva of Hirudo medicinalis, the medicinal leech, contains anticoagulant and analgesic substances thought to be responsible for the clinical effects.
Researchers are now studying a genetically engineered version of hirudin, a powerful blood thinner found in the saliva of the European leech Hirudo medicinalis.
We recently used RNA-seq to examine symbiont physiology within the digestive tract of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana (Bomar et al.