hippocratic


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Related to hippocratic: Hippocratic oath

Hippocratic

 [hip″o-krat´ik]
relating to hippocrates.
Hippocratic Oath a moral code for ethical conduct and practice in medicine, established according to the ideals of hippocrates. The text is as follows: “I swear by Apollo the physician, by Aesculapius, Hygeia, and Panacea, and I take to witness all the gods, all the goddesses, to keep according to my ability and my judgment the following oath: To consider dear to me as my parents him who taught me this art; to live in common with him and if necessary to share my goods with him; to look upon his children as my own brothers, to teach them this art if they so desire without fee or written promise; to impart to my sons and the sons of the master who taught me and the disciples who have enrolled themselves and have agreed to the rules of the profession, but to these alone, the precepts and the instruction. I will prescribe regimens for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment and never do harm to anyone. To please no one will I prescribe a deadly drug, nor give advice which may cause his death. Nor will I give a woman a pessary to procure abortion. But I will preserve the purity of my life and my art. I will not cut for stone, even for patients in whom the disease is manifest; I will leave this operation to be performed by practitioners (specialists in this art). In every house where I come I will enter only for the good of my patients, keeping myself far from all intentional ill-doing and all seduction, and especially from the pleasures of love with women or with men, be they free or slaves. All that may come to my knowledge in the exercise of my profession or outside of my profession or in daily commerce with men, which ought not to be spread abroad, I will keep secret and will never reveal. If I keep this oath faithfully, may I enjoy my life and practice my art, respected by all men and in all times; but if I swerve from it or violate it, may the reverse be my lot.”

hip·po·crat·ic

(hip'ō-krat'ik), Do not confuse this word with hypocritical.
Relating to, described by, or attributed to Hippocrates.

hip·po·crat·ic

(hip'ō-krat'ik)
Relating to, described by, or attributed to Hippocrates.

Hippocrates,

Greek physician, 460-370 B.C.
Hippocrates bandage
hippocratic - relating to, described by, or attributed to Hippocrates.
hippocratic facies - sunken appearance of facial features seen in dehydration.
hippocratic fingers - clubbing of the fingers.
Hippocratic Oath - an oath demanded of physicians about to enter the practice of their profession.
hippocratic splash - Synonym(s): hippocratic succussion
hippocratic succussion - a diagnostic procedure to test for obstruction of the pylorus of stomach. Synonym(s): hippocratic splash
hippocratism - a system of medicine attributed to Hippocrates and his disciples that is based on the imitation of nature's processes in the therapeutic management of disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many physicians have considered the commitment of the Hippocratic Oath in reference to the administration of harmful drugs as the prohibition of euthanasia (1,2).
For example, medical paternalism, the base of the Hippocratic Oath, was replaced by the patients' rights, invoking the moral and legal autonomy of them, forcing the physician to consider as prima facie duties, in addition to the autonomy duty, the beneficence and non-maleficence ones.
At a press briefing held in the Capital recently, to announce the launch of its two- year post graduate management programme, Shekhar Chaudhuri, director, SME and former director, IIM- Calcutta, said that he would explore the possibility of introducing a pledge similar to Hippocratic Oath for its inaugural batch.
Veatch successfully provides a critical reading of the Hippocratic Oath in medical ethics.
Mrs May said: "It's astonishing that the police have not had an explicit code of ethics, an equivalent if you like to the hippocratic oath for doctors.
The author, a professor of medical ethics, provides an interesting perspective on the Hippocratic Oath, which has become distilled in the popular awareness as the doctor's injunction to "do no harm.
Richard Nicholson, editor of Britain's Bulletin of Medical Ethics, said the idea strays too far from medicine's Hippocratic roots.
The doctors in Europe are also striking for higher salaries but nobody over there thought of accusing the strikers of violating the Hippocratic Oath, Rizaov concludes.
This is completely in breach of the Hippocratic Oath, and contrary to the code of ethics and humanity.
argues that professional ethics are not morally justifiable, are morally repugnant even, and that the Hippocratic Oath in particular must be abandoned by medical professionals.
Security police and the government bullied many of them into silently selling out on their Hippocratic Oath when it came to the care of activist patients.
Doctors either taking or not taking the Hippocratic Oath are assumed to live up to the oath's wisdom.