Hill criteria of evidence

Hill criteria of evidence

(hil),
a set of epidemiologic criteria that help to indicate whether a statistically significant relationship obtained in epidemiologic and other studies is causal. The criteria are consistency, specificity, strength, dose-response relationship, temporality, biologic plausibility, coherence, and capability of experimental confirmation. Temporality is the only absolute criterion: the putative cause must precede the effect in time.

Hill cri·te·ri·a of ev·i·dence

(hil krī-tēr'ē-ă ev'i-dĕns)
A calculation of epidemiologic criteria that helps to indicate whether a statistically significant relationship obtained in epidemiologic and other studies is a causal relationship. A. B. Hill's criteria (in descending order of importance) are strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biologic gradient (i.e., dose-response relationship), biologic plausibility, coherence, experimental evidence from animal studies, and analysis. Temporality is the only absolute criterion: the putative cause must precede the effect in time.
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