Hib disease

Hib disease

an infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), which mainly affects children in the first 5 years of life. It is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis, as well as childhood bacterial pneumonia, joint or bone infections, and throat inflammations. More than two thirds of the U.S. cases of Hib disease have been attributed to exposure in day-care centers. It is fatal in about 5% of infections. The infection can generally be prevented with a vaccine, given in infancy, usually at 2, 4, 6, and 12 to 18 months.

Hib disease

An infection caused by Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib). This disease mainly affects children under the age of five. In that age group, it is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, pneumonia, joint and bone infections, and throat inflammations.
Mentioned in: Mental Retardation
References in periodicals archive ?
The deferral of the booster dose was always meant to be a temporary situation, but now that nearly 18 months have passed, we have seen several cases of Hib disease primarily among unimmunized and partially immunized children.
As with pneumococcal disease, the greatest burden of Hib disease lies in Asia and Africa.
Routine use of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines has dramatically reduced the incidence of Hib disease in children <5 years of age in numerous populations (1-4).
a study design where the burden of vaccine preventable Hib disease is estimated by measuring the proportion of pneumonia and meningitis cases prevented during clinical trials of Hib conjugate vaccine, represent an important tool for estimating this undiagnosed disease burden.
CONTACT: For further information on Hib disease and pneumococcal disease or to arrange an interview with an expert, please contact: World Health Organization, Ethiopia, Dr.
Hib disease occurred primarily in children under 5 years of age in the United States prior to the initiation of a vaccine program and was estimated to account for nearly 20,000 cases of invasive infections annually, approximately 12,000 of which were meningitis.
Since the introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine, the incidence of invasive Hib disease in children has decreased by 99% (1, 2).
007 per cent and they speculate that the population may have 'natural immunity' to invasive Hib disease.
Hib disease predominantly occurred as meningitis during the pre-vaccine era in the United States, originally accounting for 50-65 percent of cases.
Hundreds of thousands of young children are dying of Hib disease because of a lack of national Hib immunisation programmes", said Dr.
Most Hib disease is seen as pneumonia, and estimates of Hib disease incidence based on meningitis data consequently underestimate the true incidence in the general population (2,12).
The introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine into national childhood immunization programs in the 1990s has resulted in a marked and sustained reduction in the incidence of invasive Hib disease in many countries (2).