heteronomy


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het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ō-mē),
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]

het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mē)
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
References in periodicals archive ?
108) A focus on heteronomy is advocated by Levinas, 'Philosophy and the Idea of Infinity', above n 33, 47 and by Jacques Derrida, 'A Roundtable Discussion with Jacques Derrida' in Laurence Simmons and Heather Worth (eds), Derrida Downunder: Deconstructing (in) the Antipodes (2001) 255.
Another example involves political leaders known for their commitment to individual freedom and for their advocacy of individual autonomy, who take the stance of life heteronomy with regard to abortion.
In this sense, the heteronomy revealed by attending to facticity demands original reconceptualizations of community beyond the notions of either Gemeinschaft or Gesselschaft.
The same search for balance also animates Panikkar's plea for "ontonomy" or a "middle voice" between and beyond heteronomy and autonomy--a plea which mounts a critical challenge both to reli gious traditionalists or fundamentalists (enamored with heteronomy) and to advocates of liberal modernity bent on erecting modernity into a creed.
For the Founders, the heteronomy of church-controlled civil law, from which Europe was then liberating itself, was to be avoided.
89) In fact, liberal feminists such as Meyers have problematized, or at least relativized, the entire process of distinguishing autonomy from heteronomy by arguing that there are many forms of partial autonomy, and that autonomy should be conceived as a competence developed over time through a process of exercise and self-reflection.
Medieval heteronomy, although an artifact of the feudal political fragmentation that resulted from the rupture of the Carolingian Empire, was legitimated by a largely theocratic conception of a just social order.
The heteronomy of an artwork, for Hagberg, takes two forms: first, in the (intentionalist) postulate that an artwork's meaning resides in some prior mental conception; and second, in the (anti-intentionalist) postulate that an artwork's meaning arises from the materials of the artistic medium itself.
This essay should, at the very least, lay to rest the canard that Kant's moral theology introduced heteronomy into his account of the moral law as Schopenhauer and subsequent critics have alleged.
The opposite of autonomy in the Piagetian sense is heteronomy.
1-117) points again to the problem of social integration in the face of the |dialectic' of the Enlightenment, the |ambivalence of the modern', where the autonomous individual, who has been liberated from the heteronomy of the past, is left alone to suffer depersonification within the anonymity of modern capitalism.
Kant's inner, moral autonomy is seen to be quite compatible with its purported contrary - outer, legal heteronomy.