Herpesviridae


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Related to Herpesviridae: Papovaviridae, Poxviridae

Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(her'pēs-vir'i-dē),
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies. Virions are enveloped, ether sensitive, and vary up to 200 nm in diameter; the nucleocapsids are 100 nm in diameter and of icosahedral symmetry, with 162 capsomeres. The family is subdivided into three subfamilies Alphaherpesvirinae, Betaherpesvirinae, and Gammaherpesvirinae, and includes herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (all of which infect humans), pseudorabies virus of swine, equine rhinopneumonitis virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, canine herpesvirus, B virus of Old World monkeys, several viruses of New World monkeys, virus III of rabbits, infectious laryngotracheitis virus of fowl, Marek disease virus of chickens, Lucké tumor virus of frogs, and many others.

Her·pes·vir·i·dae

(hĕrpēz-viri-dē)
A heterogeneous family of morphologically similar viruses, all of which contain double-stranded DNA and infect humans and a wide variety of other vertebrates. Infections produce type A inclusion bodies; in many instances, infection may remain latent for many years, even in the presence of specific circulating antibodies.

Herpesviridae

(hər″pēzvi´rô ide),
n one of the major virus families, to which the herpes simplex, varicella zoster, and Epstein-Barr viruses belong. Viruses in this family have a double-stranded linear molecular structure with icosahedral symmetry.

Herpesviridae

a family of viruses, the members of which are about 150 nm in diameter, enveloped, with a nucleocapsid of about 100 nm in diameter, composed of 162 capsomers and contain a large, double-stranded DNA. The viruses replicate in the nucleus of the infected cell, where they induce the formation of a characteristic inclusion body; some also induce formation of a cytoplasmic inclusion body. The herpesviruses are classified into three subfamilies: (1) Alphaherpesvirinae, which are rapidly growing viruses that cause acute diseases, except Marek's disease which causes tumors in chickens; (2) Betaherpesvirinae, which are slow growing, highly cell-associated viruses, also called cytomegaloviruses, which produce subtle diseases with a prolonged clinical course; and (3) Gammaherpesvirinae, some of which produce low grade, prolonged clinical illness typified by infectious mononucleosus/glandular fever of humans, caused by Epstein-Barr virus, and probably a similar disease of horses caused by equine herpesvirus 2; the primate viruses are associated with tumors.
The important diseases of animals caused by herpesviruses are dealt with under their individual headings: aujeszky's disease, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, equine viral abortion, equine viral rhinopneumonitis, equine coital exanthema, equine herpesvirus 2 infection, the Allerton form of lumpy-skin disease, the generalized infection of cattle with bovine herpesvirus 2, bovine herpes mammillitis, the African 'wildebeest-associated' malignant catarrhal fever, canine herpesvirus respiratory, genital and neonatal infections, feline viral rhinotracheitis. In birds there are infectious laryngotracheitis, pigeon herpesvirus, duck plague and marek's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is unclear whether the latter associations are "specific to Herpesviridae or just reflect nonspecific effects of infection," the investigators said.
Pseudorabies virus (PRV; family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus) contains a double-stranded DNA genome with strong genetic stability.
Molecular analyses for several groups of viruses, including Herpesviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Adenoviridae, and all influenza A viruses, were performed on frozen lung samples from the badger and binturong and on frozen conjunctival and pharyngeal swabs from the ferret.
The common ancestor of this family is thought to have diverged from the common ancestor of the family Herpesviridae (herpesviruses that infect reptiles, birds, and mammals) (6).
Its morphologic stages suggested that it replicates in a manner similar to that of members of the family Herpesviridae.
These included the following: 1) vaccination against hepatitis A (genus Hepatovirus) and measles (genus Morbillivirus); 2) serologic testing for cytomegalovirus (subfamily Betaherpesvirinae; positive), herpesvirus B (family Herpesviridae, negative), simian type D virus (simian retrovirus; SRV-1, -2, and-3; negative), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV, genus Lentivirus; negative), simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV, genus BLV-HTLV retroviruses; negative); 3) testing by polymerase chain reaction for SRV-1, -2, and -3 (negative); 4) Mantoux skin test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (negative x4); and 5) treatment for endoparasites with albendazole and avermectin, for ectoparasites with insecticide dust, and for Plasmodium spp.
Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a member of the Herpesviridae family.
For instance, all members of the family Herpesviridae are enveloped viruses that contain an icosahedral particle and double-stranded DNA, whereas all members of the family Adenoviridae are nonenveloped viruses that contain an icosahedral particle and double-stranded DNA, with projecting fibers at the vertices of the protein shell.
The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses uses the name Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (family: Herpesviridae, subfamily: Alphaherpesvirinae, genus: Simplexvirus).
In summary, laboratory investigations suggest but do not conclude that herpesviridae could directly and indirectly induce several endothelial cell responses involved in atherothrombosis (78).
Seven gene blocks in the central region I-VII) designated as herpesvirus core genes are common to all Herpesviridae.