herd instinct

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instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.

herd in·stinct

tendency or inclination to band together with and share the customs of others of a group, and to conform to the opinions and adopt the views of the group.
Synonym(s): social instinct

herd instinct

Etymology: ME, heord + L, instinctus, impulse
the basic need of social animals, including humans, for the companionship of peers and a tendency to find compatibility with the behavioral standards of others in the group.

herd in·stinct

(hĕrd in'stingkt)
Tendency or inclination to band together with and share the customs of others of a group, and to conform to the opinions and adopt the views of the group.

instinct

a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species.

herd instinct
the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its patterns of behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
We critically examine the idea that borrowing creates systemic externalities that give rise to herd behavior, catching the economy in a trap of multiple equilibria from which it can escape only with the help of a countercyclical prudential policy.
Zemsky, 1998, "Multidimensional Uncertainty and Herd Behavior in Financial Markets", American Economic Review, 88, 4, September, 724-748.
During this crisis dominated herd behavior in the form of large loans in foreign currencies, investment in real estate speculation and reporting to the U.
Given the lengthy history of financial bubbles, market failures, and mass manias, it is apparent that the financial sector is quite susceptible to herd behavior and emotion--factors that Depression-era economist John Maynard Keynes famously termed "animal spirits.
Ethical lapses, failures of understanding, herd behavior, self-deception--all contributed to the financial crisis.
Strategy Fads and Competitive Convergence: An Empirical Test for Herd Behavior in Prime-Time Television Programming, Journal of Industrial Economics, 50, 1, 2002, pp.
Those with no training-the vast majority of civilians panic and fall into herd behavior.
Yes, this exemplifies herd behavior based on incomplete information--collective movement.
Herd behavior arises, Keynes thought, not from attempts to deceive, but from the fact that, in the face of the unknown, we seek safety in numbers.
This paper presents empirical evidence in support of the claim that herd behavior can explain the severity of the 1997 Asian crisis above and beyond macroeconomic fundamentals.
Comprised of a recent video, inkjet prints, and sculpture, the show describes how this Borg-like amalgam defines us, how there's nothing natural about the natural world, and how nature, like nudity, is largely the product of herd behavior.
This wild animals are protected from direct human intrusion, and their natural herd behavior studied by scientists; at the same time, circumscribed "wilderness management" involving genetic testing and immunocontraception is necessary to prevent the herd from overgrazing its own food supply.