herbivore

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herbivore

(hûr′bə-vôr′, ûr′-)
n.
An animal that feeds chiefly on plants.

herbivore

[hərbivōr]
Etymology: L, herba, grass, vorare, to devour
an animal that subsists mostly or entirely on plants. herbivorous, adj.

herbivore

any animal feeding on plant matter.

herbivore

one of the Herbivora; animals that subsist in their natural state entirely by eating plants and plant products. In confined management systems foods of animal origin may be included in their diets, e.g. meat meal, fish meal.

non-ruminant herbivore
monogastric animals, such as horses and rabbits, able to digest roughages and other fibrous feeds in their hindgut.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, she thinks herbivores will accelerate nitrogen cycling in some plots, because in high-nitrogen systems, they stimulate growth of fast-growing plants that can tolerate grazing.
This combination of vegetationdriven processes rising from the bottom of the food-web and predator and herbivore driven processes cascading down from the top can create rich mosaics of habitats.
Such tradeoffs between habitat components have broad ecological implications, especially for interpreting fine-scale patterns of habitat selection and space use by specialist herbivores.
Our study investigated the influence of human hunting on herbivore behavioural responses, estimating vigilance and population density of common herbivores in an area of non-consumptive tourism, southern Gonarezhou National Park (hereafter, Gonarezhou), and a hunting area, Malipati Safari Area (hereafter, Malipati).
In this abiotically constrained environment, the ant fauna and their behavior are poorly known even though being important on multitrophic interactions with plants and herbivores (Byk and Del-Claro, 2011; Fagundes et al.
Legumes, with their high N content and high forage quality compared to other prairie plants, are commonly selected by mammalian herbivores (Gibson, 2009).
This group, which includes early terrestrial herbivores and large top predators, ultimately evolved into modern living mammals.
Hence, various plant traits might affect distribution of associated herbivores, such as chemical and physical defenses, plant tissues water/nutrient contents (Rossi & Stiling 1998), phenological variation in growth rate, leaf, flower and fruit production (Rehill & Schultz 2002), and plant architecture (Lawton 1983, Denno & Roderick 1991, Alonso & Herrera 1996, Espirito-Santo et al.
According to foraging theory, herbivores will maximize their foraging efficiency by consuming the most profitable food sources while minimizing the associated costs of obtaining them (Charnov 1976; Stephens and Krebs 1986).
The current study was aimed at determining whether the Asian tapir--a 300-kilogram herbivore that isn't hunted--could fill the void in seed dispersal.