Hepadnaviridae

(redirected from Hepadnaviruses)

He·pad·na·vi·ri·dae

(hē-pad'nă-vir'ā-dē),
A family of lipid-containing icosahedral DNA-containing viruses 42 mm in diameter the genome of which consists of a single molecule of noncovalently closed, circular DNA that is partially single stranded and partially double stranded; associated with hepatitis in a number of animal species. In mammals, the principal genus ortho is associated with hepatitis B virus; the genus Avihepadnavirus is associated with disease in birds. Persistent infection is common and is associated with chronic disease and liver cancer.
[hepatitis + DNA + virus]

Hepadnaviridae

/Hep·ad·na·vi·ri·dae/ (hep-ad″nah-vir´ĭ-de) the hepatitis B–like viruses: a family of DNA viruses causing infection and associated with chronic disease and neoplasia.

He·pad·na·vi·ri·dae

(hē-pad'nă-vir'ī-dē)
A family of DNA-containing viruses. The principal genus Hepadnavirus is associated with hepatitis B.
[hepatitis + DNA + virus]

He·pad·na·vi·ri·dae

(hē-pad'nă-vir'i-dē)
A family of DNA-containing viruses. The principal genus Hepadnavirus is associated with hepatitis B.
[hepatitis + DNA + virus]

Hepadnaviridae

(hepad″nəvir´-ô idē),
n one of the major virus families, to which the hepatitis B virus belongs. Viruses in this family have a double-stranded incomplete circular molecular structure with icosahedral symmetry.

Hepadnaviridae

a family of viruses that are icosahedral with a circular, partially double-strand DNA genome. The prototype virus causes serum hepatitis or hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans; related viruses cause hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in ducks, woodchucks, ground squirrels and dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hepadnaviruses generally are characterized by their narrow host range and strong hepatotropism (1).
Although hepadnaviruses generally are host restricted, exceptions have been reported (e.
Inhibitory activity of dioxolane purine analogs on wild-type and lamivudine-resistant mutants of hepadnaviruses.
The article by the University of Texas at Arlington, publishing in the online, open access journal PLoS Biology, marks the first time that endogenous hepadnaviruses have been found in any organism.
Several plants of the genus Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae) have been intensely studied and their antiviral activity against hepadnaviruses and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been conclusively proved (Notka et al.
Later chapters cover specific agents including herpes viruses, papillolmavirus, hepadnaviruses, flaviviruses, the retrovirsus family, other viruses, helicobacter, and parasites.
The major classes of viruses linked to cancer include retroviruses, herpes viruses, papilloma viruses, hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B), and flavaviruses (hepatitis C).
Distinct viral lineages from fish and amphibians reveal the 2 complex evolutionary history of hepadnaviruses.
Most of our knowledge about pathogenesis and the replication of hepatitis B virus has been obtained from studies of hepadnaviruses related to animals as models, including Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV), (41) Woodchuck Hepatitis virus (WHV), (42) Ground Squirrel Hepatitis virus (GSHV), (43) Arctic Squirrel Hepatitis virus (ASHV), (44) Heron Hepatitis B Virus (HHBV), (45) and Stork Hepatitis B Virus (STHBV).
All known hepadnaviruses that affect primates and other animals cause acute and chronic hepatic infection in their hosts.
Hepadnaviruses can infect avian and mammalian hosts but have a limited host range, infecting only their natural hosts and a few closely related species.
Hepadnaviruses mainly infect the liver cells of their hosts and, in humans, cause hepatitis B, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (2).