hematophagous


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hematophagous

 [he″mah-tof´ah-gus]
subsisting on blood.

he·ma·toph·a·gous

(hē'mă-tof'ă-gŭs, hem'ă-),
Subsisting on blood.
[hemato- + G. phagō, to eat]

hematophagous

[hem′ətof′əgəs]
1 pertaining to the feeding on blood by insects or other parasites.
2 pertaining to the destruction of erythrocytes by phagocytes.

hematophagous

subsisting on blood, e.g. hematophagous flies.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) Among all bats the hematophagous seem to show the most evident social behavior and the biggest frontal cortex as well.
The classification of the animals as to the hematophagous parasites by the FAMACHA[c] method, in percentage, was calculated by summing all the observations of the month (Figure 1).
Most of them are hematophagous as they are predominantly blood suckers of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals (Roy et al.
Adult Muscidae, which occupy a great diversity of habitats and trophic niches, could be predators of other insects, hematophagous, pollinators, or saprophagous (necrophagous and coprophagous).
histolytica is thus at least partly due to a delay in sample processing, short analysis time, analyses performed by technicians without adequate theoretical and practical training and a lack of complementary methods that help to improve the visualization of hematophagous trophozoites (21).
2) Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted to humans via infected feces of hematophagous triatomine (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae) bugs.
6%) nor did they consider them to be hematophagous (blood sucking) (96.
Nycteribiidae and Streblidae are hematophagous with piecing mouthparts (Holloway 1976; Hutson & Oldroyd 1980a, b), but adults of Mystacinobiidae feeds on guano and are merely phoretic on bats (Holloway 1976).
Antigenic relationships among rhabdoviruses from vertebrates and hematophagous arthropods.
Nematodes are known to be hematophagous, so animals under such impact would most likely experience anaemia as described for Creole does (Mahieu et al.