Helsinki Accords


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Helsinki Accords

[helsing′kē]
a declaration signed by the representatives of 35 member nations of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe in Helsinki, Finland, on August 1, 1975. The declared goals of the nonbinding document comprised four principal aspects of European security: economic cooperation, humanitarian issues, contact between the East and West, and provision for a later follow-up conference (held in Belgrade in 1978). Follow-up conferences were planned in part to allow the member nations to monitor each other's performance on humanitarian issues, such as the right to self-determination of all people and respect for fundamental freedoms, including thought, conscience, and religion or belief, without regard to race, language, sex, or religion. The Helsinki Accords grew from the precedent set by the judgments at the Nuremberg tribunals-that crimes against humanity are offenses subject to criminal prosecution. The principle and the practice of informed consent in health care grew from this precedent. Also called Helsinki Declaration. See also Nuremberg tribunal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Standing in the same room where signatories had signed the Helsinki Accords almost thirteen years earlier, he reminded the audience that the United States and Soviet Union had
But when the Russians of newly-independent Moldova (for example) refused to allow their section of Moldova to be administered by the Moldovan government, and set up their own "Republic of Transdniestria", that was a de facto breach of the Helsinki Accords--Transdniestria was not of course recognised by any of the signatories (including Russia) to the Helsinki Accords, though Russia was and is very mindful of its ethnic brethren there.
7) Daniel Thomas, The Helsinki Accord and Political Change in Eastern Europe, in THE POWER OF HUMAN RIGHTS: INTERNATIONAL NORMS AND DOMESTIC CHANGE (Thomas Risse, Stephen Ropp and Kathryn Skikkink eds.
The 1975 Helsinki Accords proved to be the crucial step ha opening the way for the subsequent peaceful democratization of the Soviet bloc.
The Helsinki accords proclaim fundamental individual rights and the concomitant principle that these rights can't be imposed by violating the principle of national sovereignty.
These arrangements, collectively known as the International Bill of Human Rights, were reaffirmed in the Helsinki Accords of 1975, and buttressed by the threat of international sanctions against offending nations.
Helsinki Watch was created as a US response to the signing of the Helsinki accords in 1975 by 35 countries, an agreement that put the concept of human rights on the world map.
This allegation, number nine on the list of grievances, contributed to the amendment's final statement that "[t]hese actions are particularly objectionable because they are in blatant violation of the Helsinki Accords.
OSCE guidelines, based on the Helsinki accords of 1975, stipulate that journalists should be permitted to travel freely between and within nations.
By 1969, however, this had gone about as far as it could, and was drawing Poland and East Germany together in opposition to it, It was Henry Kissinger's success in negotiating an end to the Berlin question, something Dr Boyle hardly mentions, which together with Chancellor Brandt's recognition of Poland's western frontiers, paved the Way for the Helsinki accords of 1975.
The most notorious action was the conviction of the noted playwright and human rights activist Vaclav Havel in February, just after Czechoslovakia had initiated the Vienna Concluding Agreement, refining and expanding the 1975 Helsinki Accords on basic human rights.
In 1980 Amalrik was killed in a car accident on his way to a conference in Madrid on the Helsinki accords.

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