Helmet Therapy

A noninterventional approach to managing craniofacial skull deformities—e.g., metopic synostosis—in which a form-fitting helmet or band is made which fits snugly on an infant's head and allows the cranial vault to mould and expand into the open areas
References in periodicals archive ?
For infants with skull flattening related to sleep position, starting helmet therapy at a younger age, especially before 24 weeks, increases the treatment success rate, suggests a study in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
The age at the initial visit and the severity of DP are important considerations in determining whether infants should be treated with repositioning or helmet therapy (Kluba et al.
However, there is controversy about how plagiocephaly should be managed, the effectiveness of current guidelines such as helmet therapy (van Wijk et al 2014; Graham et al 2005), whether it causes developmental delay (Collett et al 2013; Darrah and Bartlett 2013) or is an indication of prior risk of delayed development (Branch et al 2015; Knight et al 2013; Shweikeh et al 2013; Bialocerkowski et al 2008; Biggs 2004; Persing et al 2003).
Do not recommend helmet therapy for positional skull deformity in infants and children.
Researchers have discouraged the use of helmet therapy in infants with positional skull deformation after a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial showed no advantages over allowing the generally cosmetic condition to run its natural course.
The cranial sutures are open and normal, therefore conservative management, such as physiotherapy and helmet therapy, is frequently used to treat this condition.
1) There is also no good evidence that, for the average infant presenting with a moderate degree of plagiocephaly, helmet therapy will result in a better outcome when compared with either active repositioning or no therapy, say paediatricians from Birmingham Children's Hospital.
But after researching the condition, her parents have decided to try helmet therapy.
Usually a few weeks to a few months with the helmet therapy will correct the problem.
Physical therapywith helmet therapy if neededis the recommended treatment for most infants with position-related flattening of the skull (plagiocephaly), according to a new set of clinical guidelines in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS).
After a 2- to 3-month unsuccessful trial of positional therapy alone, 29 other patients underwent helmet therapy with uniformly normal or near normal results in skull shape.