Helicobacter


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Helicobacter

(hel'ĭ-kō-bak'tĕr),
A genus of helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and multiple sheathed flagella (unipolar or bipolar and lateral) with terminal bulbs; form nonpigmented, translucent colonies, 1-2 mm in diameter; catalase and oxidase positive. Found in gastric mucosa of primates, including human beings and ferrets; some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.

Helicobacter

/He·li·co·bac·ter/ (hel″ĭ-ko-bak´ter) a genus of gram-negative, microaerophilic bacteria of the family Spirillaceae; H. cinae´di causes proctitis and colitis in homosexual men and has been implicated in septicemia in neonates and immunocompromised patients; H. pylo´ri causes gastritis and pyloric ulcers and has been implicated in gastric carcinogenesis.

Helicobacter

[hel′ikōbak′tər]
Etymology: Gk, helix coil + bakterion, small staff
a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped, microaerophilic bacteria of the family Spirillaceae, consisting of motile, spiral organisms with multiple sheathed flagella; formerly classified in the genus Campylobacter. The bacteria are found in the gastric mucosal layer; many people are infected without showing any symptoms. H. pylori is the causative agent of stomach ulcers, gastritis, and duodenitis. It causes 90% of duodenal ulcers and 80% of gastric ulcers. Infection significantly increases the risk of developing gastric cancer or mucosal-associated-lymphoid type lymphoma. Antibiotics can eliminate infection and ulcer.

Hel·i·co·bac·ter

(hel'i-kō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of gram-negative helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and numerous sheathed flagella (unipolar or bipolar and lateral) with terminal bulbs. Form nonpigmented, translucent colonies, 1-2 mm in diameter. Catalase and oxidase positive. Found in gastric mucosa of ferrets and primates, including human beings. Some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.

Hel·i·co·bac·ter

(hel'i-kō-bak'tĕr)
Genus of helical, curved, or straight microaerophilic bacteria with rounded ends and multiple sheathed flagella with terminal bulbs. Found in gastric mucosa of primates, including human beings; some species are associated with gastric and peptic ulcers and predispose to gastric carcinoma. The type species is H. pylori.

Helicobacter

microaerophilic, curved to spiral-shaped, gram-negative bacteria associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. The type species is H. pylori. It may also be involved in the etiology of gastric neoplasia.

Helicobacter acinonys, Helicobacter canis, Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter heilmannii, Helicobacter mustelae
isolates from the stomach of cheetahs, dogs, cats, dogs and ferrets, respectively. It is likely that they may be responsible for gastric disease in these species.
Helicobacter bilis
associated with multifocal hepatitis in mice.
Helicobacter hepaticus
causes focal hepatic necrosis and focal, subacute, non-suppurative hepatitis, progressing to chronic hepatitis with bile duct hyperplasia and hepatocellular tumors in mice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma.
Clearance of chronic psoriasis after eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection.
Helicobacter pylori gastritis Updated sydney classification applied in our material.
Helicobacter pylori resistance to antibiotics in Europe and its relationship to antibiotic consumption.
1991) Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinoma among Japanese Americans in Hawaii.
Helicobacter Pioneers: firsthand accounts from the scientists who discovered Helicobacters 1892-1892.
Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori infection: A follow-up study from infancy to adulthood.
Epidemiologic studies on Helicobacter pylori infection are various.