Helenium


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Helenium

North American genus of plants in the Asteraceae family; contain sesquiterpene lactones which cause a syndrome of abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, incoordination, dyspnea. Includes H. amarum (H. tenuifolium), H. autumnale (sneezeweed, bitter weed), H. flexuosum (H. nudiflorum), H. hoopesii (orange sneezeweed), H. integrifolium, H. microcephalum (small head sneezeweed). H. amarum imparts a bitter taste to the milk of cattle which eat it. Called also Dugaldia spp., sneezeweed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heleniums and inulas are the backbone of the garden from July until September and beyond.
Expert tip: Heleniums come in all shades from deep red to pale yellow and some have stripes and bands of colour.
As with helenium, goldsturm is suited to any fertile soil with reasonable drainage and is virtually trouble-free although it is distressed in very dry conditions as well as on sandy soils in which case it should be mulched to prevent wilting.
Helenium "Chelsey", supplied to UK retailers by the Darwin PlantSpotters label who are donating profits from sales to the charity, costs pounds 7.
Heleniums are good in herbaceous borders and provide colour when many flowers are past their best.
Garden favourites are Helenium autumnale, nicknamed `sneezeweed', with yellow and bronze flowers on 1.
Daisy-like Helenium Moerheim Beauty and Inula magnifica do well in clay soil.
Helenium and michaelmas daisies tend to grow out in concentric circles leaving a woody old base at the centre - think of a pebble in a pond sending out ripples - the outer ones are the fresh growth you want to harvest while discarding the central woody base.
BEAUTY Above, Helenium stands proud, below left, Shasta daisies, and below right, blue Phlox - both varieties divide well
A single pack of this mixed collection includes one plant each of Coreopsis 'Early Sunrise', Echinacea 'PowWow White', Monarda 'Bergamo', Helenium 'Helena Red Shades' and Verbena bonariensis.
Perennials which benefit from dividing every few years include hostas, cranesbill geranium, montbretia, rudbeckia, helenium and aster.