Heberden's node


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Heberden's node

[hē′bərdənz]
Etymology: William Heberden, English physician, 1710-1801; L, nodus, knot
an abnormal cartilaginous or bony enlargement of a distal interphalangeal joint of a finger, usually occurring in degenerative diseases of the joints. Compare Bouchard's node.

Heberden's node

A rounded lentiform exostosis seen on terminal phalanges in patients with osteoarthritis.

Heberden's node

Physical exam A rounded lentiform exostosis seen on terminal phalanges in Pts with osteoarthritis.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 Heberden's nodes, a form of osteoarthritis quite common after the menopause where bone gets deposited around the last joint of the fingers.
63) with hand OA and Heberden's nodes who were admitted to the Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinic between April 2007 and December 2009, and the control group was comprised of 80 postmenopausal female patients (mean age 57.
Hand OA with Heberden's nodes is defined as a type of primary generalized OA.
A cross-sectional study of the association between Heberden's nodes, radiographic osteoarthritis of the hands, grip strength, disability and pain.
Almost always associated with other stigmata of primary generalised OA, including Heberden's nodes of DIP joints
The risk factors that are strongly associated with the incidence of knee OA include increasing age older than 50 years, female sex, higher body mass index, previous knee injury or malalignment, joint laxity, occupational or recreational usage, family history, and the presence of Heberden's nodes, they wrote.
For example, osteoarthritis of the hand, particularly Heberden's nodes, seems to have a definite hereditary component," he says.
Around the age of the menopause, the terminal joints of the fingers show osteoarthritic change with the appearance of bony outgrowths on the side of the joints - Heberden's nodes.
A These sound as if they are Heberden's nodes and they nearly always appear after the menopause, although no one knows precisely why the nodes occur.
Heberden's nodes is a form of osteoarthritis, which affects the fingers, and possibly toes, and is a sign of menopause.
These sound like Heberden's nodes, and a lot of women suffer with them.