head of fibula

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head of fib·u·la

[TA]
the superior extremity of the fibula, which articulates by a facet with the undersurface of the lateral condyle of the tibia.

head of fib·u·la

(hed fib'yū-lă) [TA]
The superior extremity of the fibula, which articulates by a facet with the undersurface of the lateral condyle of the tibia.
References in periodicals archive ?
One treatment for this consists of fusing the head of the fibula to the adjacent tibia.
Associations have also been observed with the joint capsule, lateral meniscus, posterior cruciate ligament, ligaments of Wrisberg and Humphrey, oblique popliteal ligament, the arcuate ligament complex, and to the head of the fibula (Figure 1) (Jones et al 1995, Kimura et al 1992, Last 1948, Last 1950, Terry and LaPrade 1996, Tria et al 1989, Ullrich et al 2002, Wadia et al 2003, Watanabe et al 2003).
This nerve follows the biceps tendon as it passes out of the fossa, over the lateral head of gastrocnemius, to the back of the head of the fibula (Figure 3).
Conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a destructive lesion of the head of the fibula with an intact superior tibiofibular joint and an abscess surrounding the destroyed bone.
Magnetic resonance imaging, post IV gadopentetate dimeglumine, demonstrated a destructive lesion of the head of the fibula surrounded by a fluid collection with enhancing rim, raising the possibility of an abscess (Figs.
Only patients with one or more of the following were x-rayed: - Aged 55 years or older - Tenderness at head of the fibula (the smaller long bone of the leg); - Tenderness of the patella (the kneecap); - Inability to flex the knee to 90 degrees; - Inability to bear weight for four steps, both at the time of injury and in the emergency department.
The fracture is located at the head of the fibula, just under and to the left of the knee, and is small enough not to warrant an extended stay on injured reserve, the Kings said.
Clinical decision: The OKR recommend a radiograph for patients with acute knee injuries with one or more of the following findings: age 55 years or older, tenderness at the head of the fibula, isolated tenderness of the patella, inability to flex to 90 degrees, and inability to weight bear both immediately and in the emergency department.