Hate Crime

(redirected from Hate Crimes Prevention)
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A crime committed against a member of a particular group, motivated by a prejudice against that particular group
References in periodicals archive ?
Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Hate Crimes Prevention Act of
The Hate Crimes Prevention Act (HCPA) strengthens the ability of the Justice Department to prosecute hate crimes based on race, color, national origin, and religion and give the department the power to prosecute certain hate crimes committed because of the victim's sexual orientation, gender or disability.
On April 29, the House passed HR 1913: Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 "To provide Federal assistance to States, local jurisdictions, and Indian tribes to prosecute hate crimes, and for other purposes.
Perhaps the most emotionally compelling moment of any of the hearings concerning the Hate Crimes Prevention Act was the testimony of an eighteen-year-old, Mexican-American young man named David Ritcheson.
MI-14] "Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2007" To provide Federal assistance to States, local jurisdictions, and Indian tribes to prosecute hate crimes, and for other purposes.
The bill, HR 1592 the Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2007, went before a House Judiciary subcommittee April 17.
Before the launch of the Joseph Santos Ileto Hate Crimes Prevention Fellowship Lecture Series, the family drew praise from numerous community leaders for its efforts.
Following the lead of states such as New York, there is now pending hate crime legislation in Congress, known as the Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2001 (HCPA).
Agreements were also reached by the House-Senate panel on exemptions for home schools in the Gun Free Schools Act; expanded parental options for Indian education programs within the Bureau of Indian Affairs; hate crimes prevention and religious protection; Internet filtering requirements; involvement of community-based organizations (including religious organizations) in safety and drug abuse programs; and classroom discipline policies.
Ten days after Byrd's slaying, Democratic Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts and Democratic Representative Charles Schumer of New York reintroduced in Congress the Hate Crimes Prevention Act.
An attempt to develop federal legislation through introduction of the Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 1999 (HCPA), H.