Pogonomyrmex

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Pogonomyrmex

(pō-gō'nō-mir'meks, -mer'meks),
A genus of ants, that attack humans and small animals.
Synonym(s): harvester ant
[G. pōgōn, beard, + myrmex, ant]
References in periodicals archive ?
Plant community dynamics governed by red harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbants) activities and their role as drought refugia in a semi-arid savanna.
Sociometry and sociogenesis of colonies of the harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius: distribution of workers, brood and seeds within the nest in relation to colony size and season.
Nest architecture in the western harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis (Cresson).
Students discuss the evolution of kin recognition as well as considerations relevant to interpreting studies of kin recognition; they then test the hypothesis that harvester ants recognize kin and predict that, when ants are introduced near a colony's entrance, workers will behave more aggressively toward non-nestmates (ants from another colony) than toward nestmates.
Red harvester ant colonies are capable of modifying plant populations by harvesting a large number of seeds (Rissing 1988; Whitford & DiMarco 1995; Wagner 1997) and by preferentially selecting some species over others (Hobbs 1985; Crist & MacMahon 1992).
Clark and Comanor (1975) stated that the majority of harvester ant species in the genus Pogonomyrmex may actively defoliate leaves and destroy plants growing on and near their nests in order to reduce shade because high nest temperatures are required for brood development.
They also have the unusual habit of robbing Harvester ants of the genus Pogonomyrmex, especially if their target's cargo is a termite--a favored delicacy of the Honeypot.
Insecticides used to control the fire ant plague further destroy the harvester ant population.
Whitford (1988) showed increased organic matter, total N, and organic C in nest soils of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus compared with nest-free soils, and Carlson and Whitford (1991) demonstrated elevated concentrations of P, nitrates, and K in mound soils of Pogonomyrmex occidentalis compared with non-mound soils.
Messor aciculatus is a harvester ant that conducts mass nuptial flights during the spring in Japan (Taki 1976, Onoyama 1980).
PHOTO : Harvester ant beds dot this infrared video photo of a cottonfield.