Pogonomyrmex

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Pogonomyrmex

(pō-gō'nō-mir'meks, -mer'meks),
A genus of ants, that attack humans and small animals.
Synonym(s): harvester ant
[G. pōgōn, beard, + myrmex, ant]
References in periodicals archive ?
Masoncus spider: a miniature predator of Collembola in harvester ant colonies.
Peaks in foraging activity of the California harvester ant corresponded to peaks in rainfall in 2001, 2003, 2008, and 2010, but during the highest rainfall in 2005, populations above ground were small (Fig.
Students discuss the evolution of kin recognition as well as considerations relevant to interpreting studies of kin recognition; they then test the hypothesis that harvester ants recognize kin and predict that, when ants are introduced near a colony's entrance, workers will behave more aggressively toward non-nestmates (ants from another colony) than toward nestmates.
Red harvester ant colonies are capable of modifying plant populations by harvesting a large number of seeds (Rissing 1988; Whitford & DiMarco 1995; Wagner 1997) and by preferentially selecting some species over others (Hobbs 1985; Crist & MacMahon 1992).
Clark and Comanor (1975) stated that the majority of harvester ant species in the genus Pogonomyrmex may actively defoliate leaves and destroy plants growing on and near their nests in order to reduce shade because high nest temperatures are required for brood development.
They also have the unusual habit of robbing Harvester ants of the genus Pogonomyrmex, especially if their target's cargo is a termite--a favored delicacy of the Honeypot.
The role of the Florida harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex badius, in old field mineral nutrient relationships.
On our study area, the most common harvester ant was Pogonomyrmex barbatus, a species that readily attacks P.
The newly sequenced genomes of the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) and the red harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) could provide new insights on how embryos with the same genetic code develop into either queens or worker ants and may advance our understanding of invasion biology and pest control.
The seed harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) occurs in arid and semiarid plant communities throughout much of the southwestern United States (Carlson and Whitford 1991).
The harvester ant is an important and common element of the Chihuahuan Desert arthropod fauna (Van Pelt 1983; Whitford & Ettershank 1975).