anastasis

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anastasis

An obsolete term for restoration to health.
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These analyses will serve as prelude to (re)considering "The Composition," which Hollenberg emphasizes, and "Ikon: The Harrowing of Hell," a poem from A Door in the Hive, which Hollenberg does not discuss.
She reminds readers that the Christian Creeds speak of Christ's harrowing of Hell, and suggests that similarly Maleldil the Younger might have followed Weston to Hell in order to rescue him at last" (64-65).
These particular paintings appear to show part of a Passion cycle with the risen Christ, and also a Harrowing of Hell which was the defeat of the powers of evil and the release of its victims by the descent of Christ into hell after his death.
Schreyer argues that the opening thunder and the pounding on the castle door in the Porter scene create an "acoustic link" between Macbeth and the Harrowing of Hell plays.
Drawing on both approaches, I demonstrate that the corpus of early English interludes should include three additional texts: Dame Siriz, De Clerico et Puella, and Harrowing of Hell.
This is the harrowing of hell, the answer of God's compassion to the problem of evil, given in the ultimate silence of the holiest Sabbath.
In addition to this there was a north doorway, equally grand and carrying a tympanum showing the Harrowing of Hell, and elsewhere in the church richly carved pillars.
The evolution of the doctrine of Purgatory and concomitant narrative of Christ's Harrowing of Hell appears to be related to the appearance of the monumental labyrinths in thirteenth century French churches, such as Chartres.
The egg is plain cream in color with red bands forming crosses on the outside; at the cross junctures are miniature portraits of Grand Duchesses Olga and Tatiana wearing Red Cross uniforms; inside is a gold miniature of the harrowing of hell, along with miniature portraits of saints Olga and Tatiana.
The appearances of the latter typically occur in the sixth age of humankind (from Christ's Harrowing of Hell to his Second Coming), during which the devil exhibits singularly contradictory characteristics: he is both bound in hell
Book One of The Faerie Queene is an allegory of Christ's triumph over Satan: Passion, Harrowing of Hell, Resurrection.
In the Harrowing of Hell scenes of English mystery plays, the answer to that question was no joke.