Harrison Narcotic Act

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Harrison Narcotic Act

A law enacted in 1914 that classified certain drugs as habit forming and restricted their sale and distribution.
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Eight years later came the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, which effectively banned nonmedical use of opiates and cocaine.
Like the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, the marijuana law was framed as an exercise of the congressional tax power, thereby avoiding the problem noted by Anslinger: that the Commerce Clause, as it was then understood, did not cover intrastate production and distribution of marijuana--or of anything else, which was why alcohol prohibition had required a constitutional amendment.
The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914 is widely viewed in the scholarly literature as the beginning of the U.
These three lines of intervention coalesced with the passage of the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914, which aimed to fix, once and for all, the unintended consequences of the aforementioned interventions.
12) However, in passing the Opium Exclusion Act in 1909 and in preparation for the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act in 1914, policy makers were under pressure from other commission nations to implement laws similar to theirs.
The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act and Its Lingering Consequences
What started as medicinal and curative for centuries became addictive, with the opium smokers and heroin sniffers leading--in the United States--to the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914, which essentially criminalized addiction.
The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914--regulating and taxing the production, importation, and distribution of opiates and cocaine--resulted in a spike of anti-drug films.
The Harrison Narcotics Tax Act, which gives the federal government broad power to tax the sale and manufacturing of opiates, is passed.