haptoglobin

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haptoglobin

 [hap´to-glo″bin]
a group of serum alpha2-globulin glycoproteins that bind free hemoglobin; three phenotypes, with differing abilities to bind hemoglobin, are distinguished electrophoretically.

hap·to·glo·bin (HP),

(hap'tō-glō'bin), [MIM*140100 & MIM*140210]
A group of α2-globulins in human serum, so called because of their ability to combine with hemoglobin, preventing loss in the urine; variant types form a polymorphic system, with α- and β-polypeptide chains controlled by separate genetic loci. Levels are decreased in hemolytic disorders and increased in inflammatory conditions or with tissue damage.
[G. haptō, to grasp, + hemoglobin]

haptoglobin

/hap·to·glo·bin/ (hap″to-glo´bin) a plasma glycoprotein with alpha electrophoretic mobility that irreversibly binds free hemoglobin, resulting in removal of the complex by the liver and preventing free hemoglobin from being lost in the urine; it has two major genetic variants, Hp 1 and Hp 2.

haptoglobin

(hăp′tə-glō′bĭn)
n.
A plasma protein that is a normal constituent of blood serum and functions in the binding of free hemoglobin in the bloodstream.

haptoglobin

[hap′tōglō′bin]
Etymology: Gk, haptein, to grasp; L, globus, ball
a plasma protein that irreversibly binds free hemoglobin and is removed by macrophages conserving iron. The quantity of haptoglobin is increased in certain chronic diseases and inflammatory disorders and is decreased or absent in hemolytic anemia. Normal adult findings range from 100 to 150 mg/dL. Compare transferrin. See also hemoglobinemia, hemoglobinuria.

haptoglobin

A protein in the circulation that migrates in the α2 portion of serum subjected to electrophoresis, a so-called acute phase reactant that ↑ in serum in acute inflammation or infection, stress, or necrosis Role Bind Hb released from RBCs undergoing hemolysis, preventing the accumulation of Hb in plasma; after iron has been removed, the haptoglobin-bound Hb is eliminated by the reticuloendothelial system.

hap·to·glo·bin

(hap'tō-glō'bin)
A group of α2-globulins in human serum, so called because of their ability to combine with hemoglobin; variant types form a polymorphic system, with α- and β-polypeptide chains controlled by separate genetic loci.
[G. haptō, to grasp, + hemoglobin]

haptoglobin

Alpha2 -globulin, a plasma protein that binds free haemoglobin to form a complex too large to pass out of the kidneys into the urine.

Haptoglobin

A blood protein made by the liver. Its main role is to save iron by attaching itself to any hemoglobin released from a red cell.

haptoglobin

a group of serum alpha2 globulin glycoproteins, produced by the liver, that bind free hemoglobin; important in acute phase reactions (response). The different types, genetically determined, are distinguished electrophoretically.
References in periodicals archive ?
More work is needed for better understanding of the role of haptoglobin in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.
The antioxidant activity of haptoglobin towards haemoglobin-stimulated lipid peroxidation.
Identification of haptoglobin as an angiogenic factor in sera from patients with systemic vasculitis.
Haptoglobin directly affects T cells and suppresses T helper cell type 2 cytokine release.
Haptoglobin phenotype 2-2 overrepresentation in Cys282Tyr hemochromatotic patients.
Haptoglobin phenotype and the risk of restenosis after coronary artery stent implantation.